September 14, 2020

PACKARD

New York & Ohio Co. (1899-1900)
Warren, Ohio
Ohio Automobile Co. (1900-1902)
Warren, Ohio
Packard Motor Car Co.
Warren, Ohio (1902-1903)
Detroit, Michigan (1903-1955)
Studebaker-Packard Corp. (1955-1958)
Detroit, Michigan


This is the first Packard radiator emblem (1928-1929)   mjs
Size: 57mm high 41mm wide   MM: Fox

James Ward Packard completed his first car in November 1899 in his brother's New York & Ohio Company workshop in Warren, Ohio. Four more Model A Packard cars were built and the fifth was the first to be sold. The Model B Packard went into production in 1900 and 49 were built. These early Packard cars were 7 hp single-cylinder cars offered in single-seat roadster body style only. The Ohio Automobile Company was organized in September 1900 and "Ask the Man Who Owns One" became the company slogan in 1901.

The Packard was recognized as an excellent automobile and was bought by some wealthy customers, including William Rockerfeller. In October 1902 the company became the Packard Motor Car Company and moved to Detroit in 1903. In 1903 a single-cylinder Model F Packard was driven from San Francisco to New York in a car called Old Pacific in a record time, beating the Winton record set two months earlier by two days. In January 1904 a four-cylinder Model K Packard was driven to a 77.6 mph straight mile record at Daytona.

The Model L Packard introduced in November 1903 was the first to have the distinctive Packard radiator configuration that would be the Packard hallmark for decades to follow. Packard also used distinctive red hexagonal hubcaps, which were a registered trademark. The Packard Twin Six was introduced in 1916. It was the world's first 12-cylinder car to go into series production and was built until 1923 after a total production of over 35,000 units.

Packard began to produce commercial vehicles in 1905 with a 1-1/2-ton truck powered by a 15 hp engine. This was replaced by a 3-ton capacity truck in 1908 and, in 1912, one of these trucks carried a 3-ton load in the first crossing by truck from New York to San Francisco. The Packard truck range was widened in 1912 to include 2-ton and 5-ton capacity units and by 1920 there were five truck chassis ranging from 1-1/2-ton to 7-ton capacity. Packard truck chassis were also used to build charabancs and buses. Packard truck production ceased in 1923 (see Packard Truck).

Packard passenger cars continued to grow in reputation and popularity, as new models were introduced and production grew. By now James Packard had left the company and died in 1928. In 1929 the Packard family crest became the official Packard emblem, see the example Packard radiator emblem shown above. Packard survived the Great Depression by introducing a lower-priced range of Junior Packards, which spoiled the Packard reputation for quality but kept Packard in business. As a result Packard production rose to over 109,000 in 1937.

In 1941 the Clipper was introduced and became Packard's main selling model. After World War II Clipper production was resumed but Packard never regained their former pre-eminence. In 1954 Packard merged with Studebaker but Packard sales fell and it was all over in 1958.

Emblems

The first prototype Packard Model A cars did not carry any identification mark or plate.

In 1901, Packard Models B and C carried a small brass Packard maker's patent plate attached to the body, see examples shown below. Original examples of these Packard maker's plates are very rare.

This is a Packard maker's plate (1901)    caam

                                                                                  
This is a Packard maker's plate (1901)     caam
Size: Unknown

A later black painted Packard maker's patent/serial plate was used most probably in 1902, although reproduction examples are sometimes seen attached to 1901 Packard Model B cars, most likely attached during restoration, see example shown below. Original examples of this Packard maker's patent/serial  plate are rare.

This is a Packard maker's patent/serial plate (1902)  rmsothebys
Size: Unknown  

The "Packard" name in the form of the earliest script style as used on the patent/serial plates and in advertisements was also displayed on the painted brass hub emblems, see examples shown below:

This is a Packard hub cap showing the hub emblem (1902)   ms

This is a Packard hub emblem (1902)     mjs
Size: 50mm diameter    MM: None

In 1903, the Packard Model F carried a much larger, painted cast metal patent/serial plate with a listing of patents, see example shown below. Original examples of these and similar Packard patent/serial plates are rare.

This is a Packard Model F patent/serial plate (1903)   ms
Size: Unknown

The Packard Model L appeared in 1904 and was the first use of the distinctive Packard tombstone radiator shape, which became the distinguishing symbol of Packard cars until 1928 when the first Packard emblem appeared. 

The following Packard advertisement from 1904 shows the Model L and uses the "Packard" script seen on the Packard patent/serial plates and hub caps since 1902:

This is a Packard ad showing the new radiator (1904) ms

The following photo of a surviving Packard Model L shows the distinctive Packard radiator shape:

This is a Packard Model L (1904)    conceptcarz

The Packard Model L shown above also displays a "Packard" radiator script, as do many other surviving Packard cars. These scripts are mostly reproduction scripts added many years later, as there is no evidence that Packard included radiator scripts on their production models until around 1924-25.

In 1905, the Packard Model N patent/serial plate displayed a much more extensive listing of patents, see example shown below:

This is a Packard Model N patent/serial plate (1905)  gcm
Size: Unknown 

The Packard hubcaps used in 1904 and early 1905 had the Packard company name in block letters inscribed in a circular outer ring around a plain circular center, see example shown below:

This is a Packard hubcap (1905)     gcm

In September 1905, the Packard hubcap used the first recessed hexagon in the center of the hubcap, which became another of the Packard's distinguishing features for many years to come. The hubcap hexagonal center was originally painted black, see example shown below, and was re-painted red at the Packard factory after the car had been returned after the first inspection, to show that the inspection had been completed. 

This is a Packard hubcap before the first inspection (late 1905)  ms

This is a Packard hubcap after the first inspection (c1905)  gcm

The "Packard" name was also displayed on the brass sill plates, see example shown below:

This is a Packard sill plate (c1905)     ms

The second and final version of the "Packard" script and the distinctive Packard radiator shape were both registered as Packard trademarks in 1908. The "Ask The Man Who Owns One" slogan first appeared within the Packard radiator in advertising in 1910 and the see examples shown below:

This shows the key Packard advertising logos used from 1910 

The Packard radiator design also appears, with the Packard script displayed diagonally across the radiator and with an elaborate background of Acanthus leaves, on a triangular brass plate, which was registered as a trademark in 1910, see example shown below. This Packard plate was attached to a wooden coil box attached to the dashboard on 1910-1912 Packard models. This Packard plate is very rare.

This is a Packard plate (1910-1912)     ms
Size: Unknown

The final "Packard" script also appeared on the Packard patent/serial plates also from 1910, see example shown below. This "Packard" script continued to be used until 1926.

This is a Packard patent/serial plate (1910)  gcm
Size: Unknown

The following Packard body plate was also used in 1910:

This is a Packard body plate (1910)    ms
Size: Unknown

There was a change to a triangular Packard body plate from 1911 to 1914, see examples shown below. The first photo is particularly interesting as it shows, probably reproduction, Packard body plates, displayed on an original manufacturing drawing of the 1911 Packard body plate.


Packard body plates on an original drawing of a 1911 plate eBay

This is a Packard body plate (1912)     eBay
Size:  60mm wide 51mm high

Packard used the trademark "Packard" script, radiator shape and the "Ask A Man Who Owns One" slogan in advertising, see example shown below:

This is a typical Packard ad (1911)   ms

The trademark "Packard" script was also displayed on the sill plates, see example shown below:

This is a Packard Model 30 sill plate (1911)    conceptcarz

Apart from updating the Packard patent/serial plates there was very little change in the external Packard identification plates and hubcaps between 1915-1928 with the Packard radiator shape continuing as the main distinguishing feature of Packard cars.

The following triangular plate has the usual acanthus leaves background and a Packard radiator in the center but instead of a "Packard" script it has an image of a DH4 biplane over the Packard radiator. The aircraft image relates to the Packard-built Liberty engines used in versions of the DH4 operated by the US Army Air Service in 1918, which may date this plate to the period 1919-1920. This Packard plate was most likely mounted on the dash. This Packard dash plate is very rare.

This is a Packard dash plate (c1919-1920)    sam
Size: 54mm wide 48mm high   MM: Unknown

Packard also had a motometer showing the DH4 biplane mounted on the radiator from 1919 to about 1928, see example shown below:

Boyce motormeter showing DH4 biplane used by Packard (1919-1928) eBay

A Packard factory produced radiator script, see example shown below, was used from 1923 to 1926 and was fitted to some cars in America, possibly as an optional accessory. This Packard script was used more extensively, however, on both six and eight-cylinder models made for export.

This is a Packard radiator script (1923-1926)    sam
Size:
 222mm wide

The first Packard radiator emblem appeared in 1928. The emblem was introduced in November 1928 Packard advertisements, which described the emblem design and explained that the emblem was intended to commemorate the passing of the company founders James Ward Packard and William Packard. 

The advertisement shown below explains that the emblem design was based on the English Packard family coat of arms and crest, which is described in traditional heraldic language as "Gules, a cross lozengy between four roses or. A pelican in her piety". 

Advertisement introducing the first Packard radiator emblem (1928)   tld

The first Packard emblem is the black and red enamel Packard radiator emblem shown above at the top of this post and again below. This Packard radiator emblem may have been used only briefly in 1928 and possibly early 1929 and is rare.

This is the first Packard radiator emblem (1928-1929)   mjs
Size: 57mm high 41mm wide   MM: Fox

The Packard emblem lost its red enamel on the crest above the shield in 1929. The new emblem was mounted on the radiator top and also on the stone guard where fitted, see example shown below: 

This is a Packard Custom Eight stone guard emblem (1929)  rmsothebys

The black and red radiator Packard radiator emblem shown below was used from 1929 to 1931. This Packard emblem was also used as a crank hole cover emblem and as a luggage rack emblem in 1932.

This is a Packard emblem (1929-1932)    mjs
Size: 57mm high 41mm wide   MM: Fox

There are a number of variations of this Packard emblem, which was initially made by Fox but then also by D L Auld . The high number of emblems required by Packard would also have meant new emblem dies to replace worn dies. Some examples of Packard emblem design variations are shown below:

This is a Packard emblem (1928-1932)    mjs
Size: 57mm high 41mm wide   MM: D L Auld

This is a Packard emblem (1928-1932)      mjs
Size: 57mm high 41mm wide    MM: D L Auld

This is a Packard emblem (1928-1932)     mjs
Size: 57mm high 41mm wide   MM: D L Auld

There following Packard emblem has a distinctly different design with no black enamel in the background. This Packard emblem is scarce.

This is a Packard emblem (c1928-1932)      mjs
Size: 57mm high 41mm wide   MM: D L Auld

Emblem collectors beware, as there are many reproduction Packard emblems, which can be identified by the absence of a maker's mark and indistinct reverse die marks.

A small, usually chrome plated "Packard" script was available as an optional accessory, usually mounted at the top of the radiator grille just below the radiator emblem, in 1929-1930. The following is an unplated example:

This is a Packard grille script (1929-1930)    mjs
Size: 120mm wide

The Packard emblem design was changed from 1932 to a black oval emblem with the Packard coat of arms and the model designation. The following black and red enamel Packard Twin-Six emblem was used as the crank hole cover emblem in 1932:

This is a Packard Twin-Six crank hole cover emblem (1932)    mjs
Size: 57mm high 40mm wide   MM: Unknown

The following is a red and black enamel Packard Twin-Six luggage rack emblem:

This is a Packard Twin Six luggage rack emblem (1932)   mjs
Size: 100mm diameter    MM: D L Auld

The following is a red and black enamel Packard Twin-Six hub emblem:

This is a Packard Twin-Six hub emblem (1932)    bonhams
Size: 114mm diameter    MM: Unknown

The following is a Packard Twin-Six horn button emblem in 1932. The same emblem was also used on the horn button for the Packard Twelve in 1933-1936:

This is a Packard Twin Six horn button emblem (1932-1936)  bonhams

The following black and red enamel Packard Standard Eight emblem was used as the Packard Standard Eight Model 902 crank hole cover emblem in 1932. This Packard Standard Eight emblem is scarce.

This is a Packard Standard Eight emblem (1932)    mjs
Size: 57mm high 40mm wide    MM: None

The following black and red enamel Packard 12 emblem was used as the Packard Twelve crank hole cover emblem from 1933-1937 and as an optional "Deluxe" trunk emblem in 1938:

This is a Packard Twelve emblem (1933-1938)  mjs
Size: 57mm high 40mm wide   MM: D L Auld

The following is a red and black enamel Packard Twelve luggage rack emblem:

This is a Packard Twelve luggage rack emblem (1933-1939)  mjs
Size:100mm diameter   MM: D L Auld

The following is a red and black enamel Packard Twelve hub emblem:

This is a Packard Twelve hub emblem (1933-1939)    kmc
Size: 117mm diameter    MM: D L Auld

The following is a Packard Twelve horn button emblem: 

This is a Packard Twelve horn button emblem (1937)   ms

The following black and red enamel Packard Super Eight emblem was used as the Packard Super Eight crank hole cover emblem from 1933-1937 and as an optional "Deluxe" trunk emblem in 1937-1938:

This is a Packard Super Eight emblem (1933-1938)   mjs
Size: 57mm high 40mm wide   MM: D L Auld

The Packard Super Eight "Deluxe" trunk emblem was mounted on a cast teardrop shaped base, see example shown below:

Packard Super Eight "Deluxe" trunk emblem (1937-38) allcarcentral
Size: 141mm high 65mm wide overall base   MM: Unknown 

The following red and black enamel Packard Super Eight luggage rack emblem originally had a red and black painted finish:

This is a Packard Super Eight luggage rack emblem (1933-1939) fineartamerica
Size:101mm diameter    MM: Fox

The following is a red and black painted Packard Super eight hubcap:

This is a Packard Super Eight hubcap (1933-1939)   eBay

The Following black and red enamel Packard Eight emblem was used as the Packard Eight crank hole cover emblem from 1933-1936:

This is a Packard Eight crank hole cover emblem (1933-1936)  mjs
Size: 57mm high 40mm wide    MM: D L Auld

Packard Eight crank hole cover with emblem (1933) carsfromuk

The following is a red and black painted Packard Eight luggage rack emblem:

This is a Packard Eight luggage rack emblem (1933-1936)  bonhams
Size: 101mm diameter  MM: Fox

The following black and red enamel Packard 120 emblem was used as the Packard Model 120-8 optional "Deluxe" trunk emblem in 1937. This Packard 120 emblem is scarce.

This is a Packard Model 120-8 trunk emblem (1937)  mjs
Size: 141mm high 65mm wide overall base    MM: None

Packard 120-8 trunk emblem (1937)     mjs
Size: 57mm high 43mm wide   MM: D L Auld

The following photo of a rear view of a Packard 120 shows the trunk emblem and a bumper emblem below:

This is the rear of a Packard 120 (1937)   classicdriver

The following is a red painted Packard 120 bumper emblem. This bumper emblem was used on the rear bumper of the Packard 120 in 1936-1937 and the Packard Eight in 1938.

This is a Packard 120 rear bumper emblem (1936-1938)     mjs
Size: 132mm wide 21mm high    MM: None

The following black and red enamel Packard Six was used on the Packard Model 115-6 optional "Deluxe" trunk emblem. This Packard Model 115-6 emblem is scarce.

This is a Packard Six trunk emblem (1937)    dnc
Size: 57mm high 40mm wide    MM: D L Auld

The following shows a Packard horn button emblem used in 1938 for the Packard Super Eight and Twelve models:

This shows a Packard horn button emblem (1938) thejbscollection

This is a Packard horn button emblem (1938)     kmc
Size: 62mm diameter   MM: Fox (crest)

In 1939, the Packard Twelve displayed round emblems mounted in chrome trim plates on each side of the hood, see example below:

This is a Packard Twelve hood side emblem (1939)   ms

The following red enamel Packard emblem is a Packard Twelve hood side emblem:

This is a Packard Twelve hood side emblem (1939)    mjs
Size: 57mm diameter   MM: D L Auld

The Packard Super Eight displayed similar hood side emblems mounted in different style chrome trim plates, see example shown below:

This is a Packard Super Eight hood side emblem (1940)   ms

The following red enamel Packard emblem is a Packard Super Eight hood side emblem. This Packard Super Eight emblem was also used as a trunk emblem in 1940.

This is a Packard Super Eight hood side emblem (1939-1940)  mjs
Size: 57mm diameter    MM: Unknown

Packard Super Eight Luggage Rack emblem (1940)  jill reger

The following Packard Six emblem appears very similar to the Packard Twelve and Super Eight hood side emblems shown above but has not been finished in red enamel. It is possible that this emblem was made in anticipation of a Packard Six hood side emblem but, in the event, this did not go into production. This Packard Six emblem is rare.

This appears to be a prototype Packard Six hood side emblem (c1939) mjs
Size: 57mm diameter   MM: None

The following is a Packard horn button emblem used from 1939 to 1941 on  Packard Twelve and Super Eight models:

This is a Packard horn button emblem (1939-1941)    kmc
Size: 62mm diameter     MM: poss Fox (crest)

The following shows a red enamel Packard Model 110-6 hood side emblem:

This is a Packard 110 hood side emblem (1940)   flickr

The following is a red enamel Packard Model 120-8 hood side emblem:

This is a Packard 120 hood side emblem (1940)   classiccars  

The following spear-shaped, red and black painted Packard emblem is a Packard trunk emblem used on various 110, 120 and 160 models in 1940-1941:

This is a Packard trunk emblem (1940-1941)    mjs
Size: 164mm high 52mm wide    MM: None

The following is a Packard Models 110 and 120 hood side emblem:

This is a Packard hood side emblem (1940)     dnc
Size: 160mm wide 102mm high    MM: None

The following is a Packard Model 180 hub emblem:

This is a Packard 180 hub emblem (1940-1941)    dnc
Size: 115mm diameter    MM: D L Auld

The following is a Packard Model 180 hood side trim emblem used from 1941 to 1942:

Packard Model 180 hood side emblem (1941-1942)  seconchancegarage

The following shows the Packard Model 180 trunk and bumper emblems:

Packard Model 180 trunk and bumper emblems (1941)  ms

The following is a Packard Super Eight 160 hood side trim emblem:

This is a Packard Super Eight 160 hood side emblem (1941)  flickr

There were some Darrin custom bodied Packard cars listed as Packard models between 1940 and 1942, which carried Darrin scripts, see 1941 Packard Darrin Super Eight 180 model shown below:

Packard Super Eight 180 showing side emblems and script (1941) classicdriver

Packard Darrin Super Eight 180 with Darrin script (1941) classicdriver

Packard Super Eight Darrin horn button (1941)  classicdriver

There was no Packard passenger car production from 1942 to 1946 but when production resumed in 1946 with the Packard Clipper Model, there was no external Packard emblem, except for the hexagon shape in the hubcaps and occasionally a small "Packard" script on the trunk.

The following is a Packard Clipper hub cap from 1947:

This is a Packard Clipper hub (1947)  allcollectorcars

The following is a "Packard" script displayed on the trunk lid of a 1947 Packard Clipper:

This is a Packard Clipper trunk lid script (1947)  allcollectorcars

Packard began to carry a radiator emblem again in 1948. The new Packard radiator emblem depicted the Packard coat of arms, see the red and gold enamel Packard radiator emblem shown below:

This is a Packard radiator emblem (1948)     mjs
Size: 67mm high 48mm wide    MM: Unknown

This is a Packard Eight radiator grille emblem (1948)  jill reger


There was a slight change in the Packard radiator emblem design for 1949-1950, see example shown below:

This is a Packard radiator emblem (1949-1950)    mjs
Size: 67mm high 48mm wide    MM: Fox

This is a Packard radiator grille emblem (1949)  allcollectorcars

I am most grateful to Dennis Neilsen for his helpful advice regarding the dates of use of Packard emblems. Any errors in my interpretation of this advice is entirely down to me.







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