September 19, 2019

REGAL

Regal Motor Car Co. (1908-1918)

Detroit, Michigan


This is a Regal radiator emblem (c1914)      ms
Size: 76mm wide 38mm high      MM: Unknown

The Regal introduced in 1908 was a 25 hp four-cylinder car offered in five-passenger and three-passenger runabout body styles. The Regal Thirty was introduced in 1909 and a Forty model joined the line in 1910. The Regal gained wide publicity after a Thirty model was driven from New York to San Francisco in the summer of 1909 and then crossed the country five more times before returning to Detroit a year later after a journey of about 22,000 miles.

The Regal was popular and sales grew each year from 425 in 1908 to a peak of 8,227 in 1915.  By 1913 Regal cars was also being sold overseas with a particularly good export trade in the United Kingdom, where export models were called Seabrook-R.M.C. For 1915 a 40 hp V-8 and a 20 hp light four-cylinder model were introduced.

But Regal suffered financial problems partly due to material shortages related to the First World War and was in receivership in February 1918. The last Regal car appeared in 1918.

Emblems

I have not seen original photos of the 1908 Regal Twenty-Five. It is possible that the first Regal cars in 1908 displayed a "Regal" script on the radiator grille but I cannot confirm this. However, early Regal cars did carry the "Regal" name on small nameplates, serial plates and hub caps, see examples below:

This is an early Regal nameplate (date unknown)      mjs
Size: 50mm wide 17mm high
This is an early Regal serial plate (1908)      mjs
Size: 76mm wide 26mm high

This is an early Regal hub face (date unknown)     mjs
Size: 42mm high 42mm wide


The Regal Thirty that appeared in 1909 carried a small "Regal" script emblem soldered or impressed onto the top of the radiator tank and a slightly larger "Regal" script displayed on the radiator grille, see example below:


This is a Regal Thirty taking part at the 1909 Glidden Tour      dpl

Close up showing the radiator tank top Regal emblem (1909)    dpl

Original examples of the small radiator tank top emblem would be extremely rare, while original examples of the radiator grille script are rare, see below:

This is a Regal radiator grille script (c1909)       mjs
Size: 147mm wide

The first Regal enamel radiator emblem appeared on the Regal Thirty in 1910, see example below:

This is a Regal 30 taking part in the Munsey Historic Tour (Aug 1910)     dpl

However, advertisements in January 1910 show a Regal "30" radiator grille script detail but not a radiator emblem, which suggests that the first Regal Thirty cars did not carry a radiator emblem, see examples below:

This is a "Regal 30" ad showing the radiator grille script (January 1910)    ms

Original Regal Thirty radiator scripts, as shown below, are rare:

This is a Regal Thirty radiator script (1909-1913)       mjs
Size: 298mm wide

Later in 1910, Regal advertisements did show radiator emblems for the Regal Thirty and the Regal Forty, see examples below:

This is a Regal "30" ad showing the radiator emblem (Sept 1910)     ms

This is a Regal "40" ad showing the radiator emblem (1910)     ms


The original Regal Thirty radiator emblem shown below is very rare:


This is a Regal Thirty radiator emblem (1910-c1912)     sam
Size: 76mm wide 53mm high    MM: Unknown

I have not seen a Regal Forty radiator emblem but, from the evidence of the advertisement shown above, I imagine that a Regal Forty radiator emblem did exist. An original Regal Forty radiator emblem would be extremely rare.

Regal advertisements for 1910 also show a radiator emblem for the Regal Twenty, although the Regal Twenty did not appear until the 1911 model year, see example below:

This is a Regal "20" ad showing the radiator emblem (1910)    ms 

The Regal Twenty also displayed a radiator script, see example below. Original Regal Twenty radiator scripts are very rare.

This is a Regal Twenty radiator grille script (1911)    ms


The original Regal Twenty radiator emblem shown below is extremely rare:

This is a Regal Twenty radiator emblem (1911)     mjs
Size: 76mm wide 53mm high    MM: Whitehead & Hoag

After 1911, there were a number of new Regal models. Not all of these models carried a radiator emblem with a specific model designation but, instead, carried a Regal radiator emblem of the same design as shown above but with the word "Regal" only, see example shown below. This type of Regal radiator emblem is very rare.

This is a Regal radiator emblem with no model designation (1912-1913)     mjs
Size: 76mm wide 53mm high     MM: Whitehead & Hoag

However, if you look carefully in the area just right of center under the word "Regal" in the emblem shown above, it will be seen that the surface of the emblem has been ground flat. From my observations of many Regal cars using this type of radiator emblem, this area of surface grinding is always there, see clearer example below:

This is a Regal radiator showing the almost ground-out model designation (1913)     ms

This close-up shows the earlier model designation that has been ground out (1913)

In the close-up photo shown above, part of the original Regal model designation can be seen. It is a "20" or a "30". It appears that Regal decided to drop the model designations from their radiator emblems after 1911 and used their surplus stock of earlier Regal emblems for this purpose, presumably to reduce costs.

In 1914, there was a complete change of radiator design, see examples shown below and above at the top of this post. These blue and white enamel Regal radiator emblems are very rare. 

This is a Regal radiator emblem (1914-1918)     mjs
Size: 76mm wide 36mm high     MM: Unknown

The Regal radiator emblem shown below is a variation showing a slightly different design of some of the letters in the word "Regal".

This is a Regal radiator emblem (1914-1918)      mjs
Size: 74mm wide 38mm high     MM: None

There was a special radiator emblem in 1915 for the new Regal Eight, see example shown below. This Regal Eight radiator emblem is extremely rare.

This is a Regal Eight radiator emblem (1915-1917)      sam
Size: 78mm high 77mm wide     MM: Unknown

The following emblem is a Seabrook-R.M.C. radiator emblem, which was used on a Regal model exported to the UK during the period of the First World War most likely in 1914-1915. This Seabrook-R.M.C. radiator emblem is extremely rare.

This is a Seabrook-R.M.C. radiator emblem (c1914-1915)     mjs
Size: 78mm wide 41mm high      MM: Unknown 


JEFFERY TRUCK

Thomas B. Jeffery Co. (1914-1917)

Kenosha, Wisconsin


This is a Jeffery Quad radiator emblem (1914-1917)     mjs
Size: 75mm diameter    MM: Unknown

The Thomas B. Jeffery Company had previously manufactured high quality passenger cars under the Rambler name and later under the Jeffery name.

In 1912, the US Army was considering motor vehicles to replace mule drawn transport of heavy military equipment. The US Quartermaster Corps had already seen the newly formed FWD company in Clintonville, Wisconsin and then visited the Jeffery facility in Kenosha, Wisconsin in late 1912. The US Army wanted a rugged, yet reliable motor vehicle to transport loads up to about 1-1/2-tons to 2-tons in very difficult ground conditions.

The Jeffery company engineer was Martin P. Winther, who decided to produce an entirely new truck using four-wheel drive, four-wheel steering and four-wheel brakes. The result was the Jeffery Quad, which was powered by a 36 hp four-cylinder engine and could pull large loads up very steep inclines, through deep mud and in relatively tight turning circles. The Quad impressed the US Quartermaster Corps and the first prototype Quads were delivered following trials in 1913.

The Jeffery company ran a major PR campaign to advertise the tests undertaken to prove the Quad and offered a booklet about the Quad to anyone who asked. Large orders for the Jeffery Quad followed to supply the US military and foreign governments, especially for use in the First World War in Europe.

The first 3,000 Jeffery Quad trucks were produced in 1914 together with some Jeffery Rapid delivery wagons with a 1,500 lb capacity. These delivery wagons were joined by chain-driven All-Purpose trucks of 1-ton and 1-1/2-ton capacities.

The Jeffery Quad became a huge success and the Jeffery plant was turned exclusively to the production of Quad trucks. The demand for the Quad truck became so high that production was also subcontracted to Hudson, National and Paige. Estimates vary but Jeffery is understood to have produced over 20,000 Quad trucks.

Charles Jeffery sold the Thomas B. Jeffery Company to Charles Nash in 1916 and from the 1918 model year the Jeffery Quad became the Nash Quad. 

Emblems

The Jeffery Rapid delivery wagon and the Jeffery All-Purpose trucks carried the same blue, white and red enamel radiator emblem as the Jeffery passenger car, see below:


This is a Jeffery All-Purpose truck showing the round radiator emblem (1914)    tom
Kenosha County Historical Society

The Jeffery truck radiator emblem shown below was also used on Jeffery passenger cars and is rare.

This is a Jeffery radiator emblem used on rapid delivery wagons and all-purpose trucks (1914-1915)    mjs
Size: 63mm diameter       MM: Unknown 

The first Jeffery Quad trucks a carried a larger diameter blue, white and red enamel radiator emblem, see example shown above at the top of this post. This Jeffery Quad radiator emblem is extremely rare.

But, beware, there is a Jeffery Quad emblem with unbalanced lettering at the bottom, see example below, which I believe is a reproduction emblem:


This is believed to be a reproduction Jeffery Quad emblem    ms

The Jeffery Quad was also known simply as the Quad and some versions of the Jeffery Quad carried a nameplate on the front of the radiator displaying the word "QUAD", see original photo below:

This is a Jeffery Quad showing the "QUAD" nameplate (c1916)    tom
Kenosha County Historical Society

The "QUAD" radiator nameplate shown above was most likely displayed on Jeffery Quad trucks used for military purposes during the First World War.













CINO

Haberer & Co. (1910-1913)

Cincinnati, Ohio


This is a Cino radiator emblem (1910-1913)     sam
Size: 78mm wide 46mm high    MM: Unknown

Haberer & Company was an established carriage builder when they decided  to enter the automotive market in 1910. The first Cino was a 40 hp four-cylinder car offered in touring and roadster body styles.

A 60 hp six-cylinder model was added to the line in 1912 but production ceased in early 1913 following a serious flood, which ruined the manufacturing plant.

Emblem

The Cino script logo appeared on early advertisements, see example below:

This is a Cino advertisement showing a script logo (1910)    ms

The Cino carried a red and white enamel radiator emblem, see example shown above at the top of this post. This Cino radiator emblem is very rare.


September 03, 2019

SCHACHT

Schacht Manufacturing Co. (1904-1909)

Schacht Motor Car Co. (1909-1913)

G A Schacht Motor Truck Co. (1913-1927)

LeBlond-Schacht Truck Co. (1927-1940)

Cincinnati, Ohio


This is a Schacht passenger car radiator emblem (c1911-1913)     sam
Size: 57mm diameter    MM: Unknown

The Schacht Manufacturing Company was a well established buggy builder when in 1904 it produced a 10 hp two-cylinder runabout. In 1905 a 30 hp four-cylinder was added to the line. A two-cylinder high wheel runabout was offered in 1907 and high wheelers only were offered from 1908 to 1910. The Schacht company slogan was the "Invincible Schacht". The company was renamed as the Schacht Motor Car Company in 1909 and a line of more conventional four-cylinder cars was offered from 1910 together with a range of trucks until 1913 when passenger car production ceased.

The company was reorganized as the G A Schacht Motor Truck Company in 1913 to concentrate on the manufacture of commercial vehicles only. Early Schacht trucks were conventional machines from 1/2-ton to 4-ton capacity and by 1922 the range ran from 2-ton to 7-ton capacity. In 1926 Schacht introduced the Super Safety Coach powered by a 49 hp six-cylinder engine. Schacht ran into financial difficulties and found financial support from LeBlond in 1927 when the company was reorganized as LeBlond-Schacht Truck Company. The trucks continued to carry a Schacht radiator emblem.

A period of expansion followed. In 1928 the company bought the Armleder Truck Company. Even so, truck production remained modest with about 360 units sold in 1930. The truck range in the early 1930's went from 1-1/2-ton to 10-ton capacity. A new small lightweight, fast truck was introduced in 1930 that became popular as a chassis for fire engines, particularly for Ahrens-Fox. In 1936 the company acquired Ahrens-Fox and in 1938 LeBlond-Schacht withdrew from the truck market to specialize in fire apparatus. Ahrens-Fox and Schacht fire apparatus continued to be built until 1940.

Emblems

The earliest Schacht runabouts and touring models did not carry a radiator emblem or a radiator script but did display the Schacht name on a small brass maker's nameplate attached to the side of the vehicle, see example below. This Schacht maker's nameplate is very rare.

This is a Schacht maker's nameplate (c1904)      mjs
Size: 87mm wide 37mm high

A brass "Schacht" script was displayed on the radiator core of Schacht vehicles certainly by 1909 but probably by about 1907, although I cannot confirm this date., see example below. Original Schacht radiator scripts are rare.

This is a Schacht radiator script (c1909)     mjs
Size: 196mm wide

Schacht passenger cars carried a red, white and orange enamel radiator emblem from about 1911 or 1912 until passenger car production ceased in 1913, see example shown above at the top of this post. This Schacht passenger car radiator emblem is extremely rare. I cannot confirm the exact start date for this radiator emblem but surviving Schacht cars from 1910 do not appear to have had a radiator emblem.

Schacht trucks continued to use the Schacht radiator script but by the early 1920's and possibly earlier, Schacht  trucks displayed the "Schacht" name embossed into the radiator tank top, see 1922 Schacht truck advertisement shown below:

This is a Schacht truck advertisement (1922)      ms

Detail showing Schacht name on radiator tank top    ms

The following photo shows the embossed "Schacht" name on the radiator tank top of a Schacht truck from the late 1920's:

This shows the Schacht name embossed into the radiator tank top (c1927)    aacaf

From about 1930. LeBlond-Schacht trucks carried a new red, white and blue enamel radiator emblem, see example below. This Schacht truck radiator emblem is scarce and is often, incorrectly, believed to be a Schacht passenger car radiator emblem.

This is a Schacht truck radiator emblem (c1930-1940)     mjs
Size: 107mm wide 73mm high    MM: Mayer









GARFORD

Garford Co. (1907-1908; 1911-1913)

Elyria, Ohio


This is a Garford radiator emblem (late1907-1908; 1911-1913)     mjs
Size: 58mm diameter     MM: Unknown

Arthur L Garford had been involved in bicycle manufacturing but decided to move into the automobile component business and established the Federal Manufacturing Company in 1903. Garford then widened his operations and to supply the automotive industry with complete chassis. Auto companies using Garford chassis included Ardsley, Gaeth, Cleveland, Rainier and Studebaker. 

The contract to supply chassis to Studebaker, which commenced in late 1903, did not allow Garford to market an automobile in their own name. Motor cars produced by Garford were referred to as Studebaker-Garford or Studebaker. But, in October 1907 Garford introduced their four-cylinder Models A and B at the Grand Central Palace Show as Garford cars. They were sold in 1908 and entered the Glidden Tour and other competitions as Garford. Studebaker objected to this infringement of their contract with Garford and the Garford name was dropped. The contract with Studebaker was finally terminated in 1910 after when Garford was able to put the Garford name to its cars again.

The first legal Garford car was the four-cylinder 40 hp Model G-7, which was shown at the New York Automobile Show in January 1911. This was also the last Studebaker-Garford car marketed by Studebaker. Garford produced improved versions of the Model G for 1912 and 1913, including six-cylinder models, which were introduced in 1912. 


Garford suffered difficulties, however, because, having relied on its contract with Studebaker, it had not developed a dealership network of its own. The Garford automobile manufacturing business was sold to Willys-Overland in 1912 and the final Garford cars appeared in 1913. Thereafter, the Garford name continued on commercial vehicles only.

Emblems

The first cars produced by Garford in late 1903 and 1904, were marketed as Studebaker-Garford or Studebaker, and did not carry an emblem. They would have displayed the Studebaker name on small plates attached to the outside of the body or under the driver's seat.

Cars built by Garford in 1905 and 1906, were still Studebaker-Garford and displayed Studebaker radiator emblems and/or Studebaker radiator scripts (see Studebaker).

Cars built by Garford from 1907 carried a round, painted Studebaker-Garford radiator emblem mounted on the radiator tank top. The Studebaker-Garford radiator emblem was used until 1911.

In October 1907 and through 1908, Garford infringed their contract with Studebaker by marketing some of their four-cylinder Models A and B as Garford cars. The 1908 Garford advertisement shown below includes two Garford logos, the "Garford" script logo at the top and a logo consisting of a stylized letter "G" within a diamond surround at the bottom:

This is a Garford ad showing two logos (1908)   ms

The following original photo shows a Garford car taking part in the 1908 Glidden Tour:

This is a Garford car taking part in the Glidden Tour showing a radiator emblem (1908)     dpl

The Garford car shown above is carrying a round, domed radiator emblem, which displays the stylized letter "G" in a diamond logo. An example of this round, domed, black enamel Garford radiator emblem is shown above at the top of this post. This Garford radiator emblem was used on Garford automobiles in late 1907 and through 1908 and again from 1911 after the cancellation of the contract with Studebaker and is extremely rare.

Other original photos taken in 1908 show Garford automobiles carrying the radiator emblem shown above and the two forms of Garford logo displayed in the form of brass scripts attached to the radiator core, see examples shown below:

This Garford car displays the Garford script logo (1908)    dpl

This Garford car displays a brass "G" in diamond logo script (1908)    dpl

Original Garford radiator logo scripts, as shown above, would be extremely rare. If you have better photos of these scripts, please send copies in order to up date this post.

By about 1912, the Garford script logo had changed slightly, see below:

This Garford Six ad shows a revised Garford script logo (1913)  ms

This is a Garford radiator script (c1912-1913)     sam
Size: 350mm wide

The original Garford radiator script shown above is very rare.



NOBLE TRUCK

Noble Motor Truck Co. (1917-1931)

Kendallville, Indiana


This is a Noble truck radiator emblem (date unknown)     natm
Size: 172mm wide 75mm high 

The Noble was a conventional assembled truck and, at times over the life of the Noble, was offered in eight models ranging in capacity from 1-ton to 5-tons. From 1921, all Noble trucks were powered by six-cylinder Buda engines.

The Noble did not survive the Great Depression and it was all over by 1931.

Emblems

The Noble radiator emblem shown above was also used as a nameplate attached to both sides of the hood, see below:

This Noble truck displays common radiator and hood side emblems     natm

The heavier Noble trucks had the Noble name embossed in the radiator tank top and a Noble nameplate on the sides of the radiator, see example below:

This Noble emblem is embossed in the radiator tank top (date unknown)    natm
Size: 253mm wide

This Noble truck has an embossed radiator emblem and side plates   natm

I do not know the dates of use of these emblems. If you have these details, please let me know, in order to update this post.




July 26, 2019

BOUR-DAVIS

Bour-Davis Motor Car Co. (1916-1917)

Detroit, Michigan

Shadbourne Bros. Co. (1918)

Frankfort, Indiana

Louisiana Motor Car Co. (1919-1922)

Shreveport. Louisiana


This is a Bour-Davis radiator emblem (1916-1917)    sam
Size: 98mm wide 32mm high    MM: Unknown

The Bour-Davis was an assembled car using a six-cylinder Continental engine with a distinctive appearance resulting from a radiator slanting at the same angle as the windshield and the rear of the body. The Bour-Davis was first built in Detroit but by 1918 the Shadbourne Brothers Company had taken over the Bour-Davis business and a few were built in their Frankfort plant in Indiana.

In 1919 the Bour-Davis became part of the Louisiana Motor Car Company with a factory in Cedar Grove. The Bour-Davis now had its radiator placed slightly ahead of the front axle and a higher hood but was otherwise the same car as before. Production of the Bour-Davis was underway again in 1920 with plans for expansion but the postwar recession hit the industry hard and the Bour-Davis was finished by 1922.

Emblems

The red and white enamel Bour-Davis radiator emblem shown above is believed to date from 1916-1917 when the Bour-Davis was built in Detroit and is very rare.

The Bour-Davis radiator emblem shown below is an original emblem used on one of only eighteen Bour-Davis cars built by the Shadbourne Brothers in Frankfort, Indiana in 1918. This emblem is ultra rare.

This is a radiator emblem for a Bour-Davis built in Frankfort (1918)     mjs
Size: 102mm wide 37mm high   MM: Unknown

I do not know the dates of use of the unusual blue and white enamel Bour-Davis radiator emblem shown below. This Bour-Davis radiator emblem is very rare. If you have further details, please let me know, in order to update this post.

This is a Bour-Davis radiator emblem (dates unknown)    sam
Size: 90mm wide 33mm high    MM: Unknown