July 23, 2021

COLUMBIA SIX

Columbia Motors Co. (1916-1924)
Detroit, Michigan


This is a Columbia Six radiator emblem (1918-c1924)      mjs
Size: 58mm wide 58mm high     MM: D L Auld

The Columbia Motors Company was established in 1915 by a group of distinguished and experienced motor industry executives, including William E. Metzger, one of the founders of the E-M-F company.

The Columbia Six, introduced for the 1917 model year, was a fine assembled car, using high quality units. The car was nicely finished with good quality furnishings and was advertised as "The Gem of the Highway". It utilized an exclusive thermostatically controlled radiator shutter system. 

The Columbia Six was popular and sales rose each year, reaching just under 6,000 by 1923, when the company made a number of expensive acquisitions in anticipation of a boom in business, which did not happen. Columbia had overextended itself and was finished later in 1924.

Emblems

The Columbia Six car was named after the popular female personification of the United States, Columbia, who was often depicted clothed in the Stars and Stripes flag about the time of the introduction of the Columbia Six and throughout the First World War. 

The Columbia Six radiator emblem design showed the profiled head of Columbia wearing a bonnet and laurel wreath head-dress. This design is seen in the following Columbia Six advertisement from 1917, together with a photo of a Columbia Six Model D showing the radiator emblem:

Columbia Six ad showing radiator emblem (1917)  tma

Close-up showing radiator emblem and design logo (1917)  tma

The first Columbia Six cars in 1917 carried a red, white and blue enamel radiator emblem, which displayed the head of Columbia over the name "COLUMBIA" in large letters, as shown in the advertisement shown above, see example below. This Columbia Six radiator emblem is extremely rare.

This is a Columbia Six radiator emblem (1917-1918)    mjs
Size:58mm wide 58mm high     MM: Unknown

Columbia Six advertisements in early 1918 show the same emblem design as shown above but, later in 1918, the design was changed to show the Columbia head profile over the words "COLUMBIA SIX", see Columbia Six advertisement shown below:

Columbia Six ad showing the new logo/emblem design (1918)  

The new Columbia Six radiator emblem used a slightly simplified representation of Columbia's hair and laurel wreath head-dress, and included the additional inscription "Made in Detroit", see red, white and blue Columbia six radiator emblem shown above at the top of this post and again below. This radiator emblem was used on the vast majority of Columbia Six cars but is rare, nevertheless.

This is a Columbia Six radiator emblem (1918-c1924)    mjs
Size: 58mm wide 58mm high   MM: D L Auld

In 1924, the Columbia Six Tiger models carried a blue and white enamel version of this radiator emblem, see original period photo shown below. Other models in 1924 appear to have continued to use the previous red, white and blue Columbia Six radiator emblem. 

This is a Columbia Six Tiger Sport with blue & white emblem (1924) flp

Apart from the colors, the blue and white enamel Columbia Six radiator emblem shown below is exactly the same simplified design as the red, white and blue version shown earlier above. This blue and white version of the Columbia Six radiator emblem had limited use and is very rare.

This is a Columbia Six radiator emblem (1924)     mjs
Size: 58mm wide 58mm high   MM: Unknown (poss D L Auld)

The red, white and blue enamel Columbia Six emblem shown below is a mystery. It uses precisely the same simplified design of Columbia's profile, hair and laurel wreath head-dress as for the emblems used from 1918 to 1924 but set over a completely different inscription "Columbia Motors Co." and "Detroit U.S.A.". This inscription suggests that this Columbia radiator emblem may have been made for Columbia Six models intended for export. The emblem may have been made around 1923 at the time when the Columbia Motors Company was anticipating a boom in business which did not happen. This Columbia Six radiator emblem is extremely rare.

This appears to be a Columbia Six radiator emblem (poss 1923-1924) cwc
Size: 58mm wide 58mm high    MM: Unknown







LAFAYETTE

LaFayette Motors Co. (1920-1922)

Indianapolis, Indiana

LaFayette Motors Corp. (1922-1923)

Nash Motors Co. (1924)

Milwaukee, Wisconsin


This is a Lafayette radiator emblem (1920-1924)     mjs
Size: 60mm high 50mm wide    MM: None

The Lafayette Motors Company was founded in 1919 by Charles W. Nash, who planned to make a luxury car that was not connected with Nash Motors (see Nash). 

The Lafayette was introduced as a 1921 model and was a 90 hp V-8 available in a range of open and closed body styles. But, with the country in the midst of a post-war depression, this was not a good time to launch a new luxury car. Only 685 Lafayette cars were sold in 1921. In July 1922 Nash moved production to a plant in Milwaukee to be closer to his Nash Motors operation.

The company was reorganized as Lafayette Motors Corporation in 1922 but sales continued to be disappointing and in 1923 the stockholders sold out to Nash. The last Lafayette cars were built in 1924 and Charles Nash gave up the idea of a luxury car. Total production of the Lafayette was 1,860 cars. Nash came back to the Lafayette name in 1934, but this time it was to be a lower-priced Nash.

Emblems

The Lafayette radiator emblem was in the form of a small, oval-shaped cameo with the profile of the Marquis de la Fayette carved in white on a black enamel background, see example shown above. This Lafayette radiator emblem is rare.

The following black and white enamel Lafayette emblems are hub emblems and both examples are rare.


This is an Indianapolis built Lafayette hub emblem (1920-1922)  mjs
Size: 58mm diameter   MM: Unknown

This is a Milwaukee built Lafayette hub emblem (1922-1924)     mjs
Size: 58mm diameter    MM: None





ASTOR

M. P. Moller Motor Co. (1925-1927)

Hagerstown, Maryland


This is an Astor radiator emblem (1925-1927)      mjs
Size: 114mm wide  62mm high    MM: None

The four-cylinder Buda engined Astor, built between 1925 and 1927, was one of several taxicab makes produced by Moller, makers of the Dagmar (see Dagmar).

The Astor had a distinctive vee-shaped aluminum radiator and an unusual body color scheme comprising a beige lower body with black top, running-boards and fenders, and with a bright orange belt line and disc wheels. The Astor was marketed by the Astor Cab Company of New York City, but most Astor sales were in Philadelphia.

Emblem

The cast aluminum Astor radiator emblem shown above is rare.



LOCOMOBILE

Locomobile Company of America
Watertown, Massachusetts (1899-1900)
Bridgeport, Connecticut (1901-1929)


This is a Locomobile radiator emblem (1929)     mjs
Size: 53mm diameter    MM: D L Auld

In 1899, John Brisben Walker and Amzi Lorenzo Barber bought the Stanley Brothers steam car business and produced steam cars in Watertown under the name Locomobile. The partnership broke up soon after. Walker moved to Tarrytown to build the same car but now called the Mobile and Barber remained in Watertown with the Locomobile name. In 1900, Barber secured a factory in Bridgeport, Connecticut and moved all Locomobile production there in 1901.

By May 1902, over 4,000 Locomobiles had been built. A gasoline Locomobile, designed in secret by Andrew Lawrence Riker (see Riker), was also built in 1902 and was introduced alongside Locomobile steamers in 1903. Steamers were discontinued in 1905.

The Riker-designed Locomobile gasoline car was an excellent but expensive automobile. In 1908, a 1906 Locomobile, called "Old 16", won the Vanderbilt Cup and Locomobile won other races in that year. In 1911, a six-cylinder T-head Locomobile was introduced as the Model 48 and this model would last as long as the Locomobile itself, with models in the late 1920's developing over 100 hp.

In 1914, Locomobile set up a special department to make customized models for wealthy clients. All seemed to be going very well but problems were to follow. A new management in 1915 planned a big expansion and purchased large quantities of materials on credit, but in 1919 these loans were called in during the postwar depression and there was no money to pay for them. Receivership followed.

In 1922, Emlen S. Hare bought Locomobile along with Mercer and Simplex to build a new motor car empire but this failed and Billy Durant took over in 1922. He kept the superb Model 48 but introduced a number of lower quality models, including the Locomobile Junior Eight in 1925. In 1929, the Model 88 was announced but the stock market crash brought an end to the Locomobile later in 1929.

Locomobile had also built commercial vehicles from 1901 until 1916. The first Locomobile commercial was a 1/2-ton steam delivery vehicle in 1901. By 1912, Locomobile introduced a 5-ton gasoline-powered truck and in 1915 a line of trucks was introduced, ranging from 3-ton to 6-ton capacity. In 1916, Locomobile trucks were renamed Riker (see Riker Truck). 

Emblems

The Locomobile did not carry an emblem for many years but early vehicles did display the "Locomobile" name on small maker's nameplates and serial plates attached to the body of the vehicle, usually at the rear or under the driver's seat.

The "Locomobile" logo script appeared in the earliest Locomobile advertisements from 1899, see examples shown below:

This is a Locomobile ad showing logo script (1899) ms

This is a Locomobile ad showing logo script (1899)  ms

The "Locomobile" logo script was also used on Locomobile maker's plates and serial plates, see examples shown below. Original early Locomobile serial plates and nameplates are rare.

This is a Locomobile serial plate (c1900)    khc
Size:

This is a Locomobile serial plate (1901)     mjs
Size: 82mm wide 54mm high

This is a Locomobile serial plate (1902)     ms

This is a Locomobile serial plate (1904)      mjs
Size: 83mm wide 50mm high

This is a Locomobile nameplate (c1909)     mjs
Size: 80mm wide 29mm high

The Locomobile name was also displayed on the hubcaps, see examples shown below, but first a hub emblem displaying an early Locomobile logo design:

This is an early Locomobile hub emblem (date unknown)     mjs
Size: 61mm diameter

This is a Locomobile hub emblem (c1909)     sam

                                                                       
This is a Locomobile hub emblem (c1910)    ms

This is a Locomobile hub face (c1912)    mjs
Size: 72mm diameter

The Locomobile owners were not particularly interested to display the "Locomobile" name prominently on their early cars, even when taking part in races or tours. The first use of a "Locomobile" radiator script appears to be in 1905, see original photo shown below, but other original photos taken at that time at public events, and for some years later, do not show a radiator script.

This is a Locomobile displaying a radiator script (1905)   dpl

Radiator scripts are commonly displayed on surviving Locomobile cars, see examples shown below, although many of these have been added later. Original Locomobile radiator scripts are rare.

This is a Locomobile showing radiator script (1908)    ms 

This is a Locomobile radiator script (1914)    conceptcarz

This is a Locomobile radiator script (1927)   rmsothebys

The Locomobile Junior Eight model introduced in 1925 carried a small, black and white enamel rectangular radiator emblem, see example shown below. This was the first Locomobile radiator emblem and is very rare.

This is a Locomobile Junior radiator emblem (1925-1927)   mjs
Size: 76mm wide 9mm high   MM: Unknown (poss D L Auld)

The following photos show examples of Locomobile Junior Eight hub emblems:

This is a Locomobile Junior Eight hub emblem (1925-1927)  mjs
Size: 63mm diameter

                                                                                    
This is a Locomobile Junior Eight hub (1925-1927)   dkc

In 1928, the Model 48 carried a small rectangular Locomobile radiator emblem, similar to the Junior Eight emblem shown earlier, see example below:

This is a Locomobile Model 48 with a radiator emblem (1928) linkmotors

The black and white enamel Locomobile radiator emblem is shown below. This Locomobile radiator emblem was also used on the Model 8-70. This Locomobile radiator emblem is very rare.

This is a Locomobile radiator emblem (1928)     mjs
Size: 76mm wide 9mm high   MM: D L Auld

There is another, similar white and black enamel Locomobile radiator emblem, see example shown below, probably around the same time as the previous emblems but I do not know which Locomobile models used this emblem, which is very rare.

This is a Locomobile radiator emblem (c1927-1928)    mjs
Size: 76mm wide 9mm high   MM: Unknown (poss D L Auld)

The 115 hp Model 88 introduced in 1929 was advertised as the "first Locomobile ever to wear a crest". This was the round, multi-colored enamel Locomobile radiator emblem bearing a shield shown above at the top of this post and again below. Very few were built before the Locomobile was finished later in 1929, making this another very rare Locomobile radiator emblem.

This is a Locomobilr radiator emblem (1929)     mjs
Size: 53mm diameter     MM: D L Auld






FORD TRUCK

Ford Motor Co. (1903-present)
Detroit, Michigan


This is a Ford V8 truck hood side emblem (1935-1936)    mjs
Size: 140mm wide 120mm high   

After some years of experimentation and the design of race cars, Henry Ford started serious production of passenger cars with his Ford Motor Company in 1903 (see Ford). His Ford passenger car business was so successful, that there was no real pressure on Henry Ford to enter the commercial vehicle market, although there were some early examples of Ford commercial vehicles.

The first Ford commercial was the Ford Delivery Car in 1905, based on the Ford Model C passenger car chassis, but only twelve examples were built.The Ford Delivery Van in 1907 used the four-cylinder Model N passenger car chassis but, again, only a few were built. In 1912, two light duty commercial models were offered, the Ford Commercial Roadster, which was a Model T runabout with an after market commercial body, and the Model T Delivery Car, which had better sales but not enough to warrant serious commercial vehicle production, although Ford Model T conversion kits offered by other manufacturers became very popular.

Ford entered the truck market in July 1914 with the introduction of the Ford Model TT truck for heavier duty than the modified Model T, both of which needed to be fitted with after market bodies. The first factory cataloged Ford truck was the 1924 Ford Model TT with an Express Body. The first Ford Model T pickup trucks appeared in 1925 and a new Ford Model AA 1-1/2-ton truck was introduced in 1928. Ford became the top manufacturer of commercial vehicles in the US and maintained this position into the 1930's.

Ford expanded into heavier-duty trucks and reached up to 3-ton capacity by the late 1940's. Ford was active in producing heavy vehicles for the military in the Second World War. After the War, in 1948, Ford introduced the new F-Series trucks, which continued to form the basis of Ford truck development for many years. Ford continues today as a major producer of commercial vehicles. 

Emblems

The early Ford commercial vehicles carried the same external identification as the passenger car chassis on which they were based. From 1905 to the 1928 model year, Ford commercial vehicles carried the "Ford" name stamped into the top front of the radiator or radiator shell. The "Ford" name was also displayed on radiator mounted scripts (see Ford for details).

The first oval Ford radiator emblem in America appeared in 1928 with the introduction of the Ford Model A and the Ford Model AA 1-1/2-ton truck. The Ford Model A passenger car carried the familiar blue enamel oval radiator emblem. The Ford Model AA truck, however, carried a non-enamelled version of this same Ford radiator emblem until early 1932, see example shown below. This Ford truck radiator emblem was also used on some Ford Model A pickups in the same period and is scarce.

This is a Ford Model AA truck radiator emblem (1928-1930) dnc
Size: 74mm wide 36mm high    MM: Day Neameplates

There was a change to a smaller blue enamel Ford radiator emblem for all Ford trucks and pickups from 1932 through 1935, see example shown below:

This is a Ford commercial radiator emblem (1932-1935)  mjs
Size: 56mm wide 26mm high   MM: Fox

From about 1933 to 1935, Ford trucks and pickups using V8 engines also displayed a "V8"emblem on the radiator grille, see example shown below:

This is a Ford V8 commercial grille emblem (1933-1935)  mjs
Size: 87mm high 60mm wide

For 1934 only, Ford trucks also displayed a large oval, blue painted Ford hood side emblem with a flat metal "V8" emblem mounted directly below the hood side emblem, see examples shown below:

This is a Ford truck hood side emblem (1934)    lktec
Size:133mm wide 57mm high

This is a Ford V8 truck hood side emblem (1934)    mjs
Size: 67mm high 50mm wide

For 1935-1936, the following Ford V8 emblem was mounted on the center of the truck hood side panel in 1935 and the same emblem was moved to the front of the hood side panel in 1936. 

This is a Ford V8 truck hood side emblem (1935-1936)  lktec
Size: 140mm wide  120mm high   

Some Ford truck models had similar hood side emblems stamped with the load carrying capacity, see two-ton example shown below. This Ford two-ton hood side emblem is rare.

This is a Ford 2-ton truck hood side emblem (1935-1936) lktec
Size: 140mm wide 120mm high 

For 1936 only, Ford trucks carried the same, small oval shaped,  blue enamel radiator grille emblem as used on 1935-1936 passenger cars, see example shown below:

This is a Ford truck radiator grille emblem (1936)   mjs
Size: 45mm wide 23mm high    MM: Fox

There was a change of radiator grille emblem for 1937 to a blue painted diecast chrome emblem forming part of the hood ornament and blue painted V8 hood side emblems, see examples shown below for the 60 hp and 85 hp Ford pickup models:

Ford 60 hp pickup (1937)    ms


This is a Ford 60 hp pickup grille emblem (1937)     ms

This is a Ford 60 hp hood side emblem (1937) mjs
Size:140mm high 60mm wide   

Ford 85 hp pickup grille emblem (1937) mkmiller

This is a Ford 85 hp hood side emblem (1937) mjs
Size: 140mm high 60mm wide  

For 1938, the Ford V8 truck emblem formed part of the upper radiator grille on pickups and trucks with a hood, see example shown below:

Ford V8 truck with grille emblem & hood side emblem(1938) wiki

Close up showing Ford V8 grille emblem (1938)  ms

The first Ford cab over engine truck models were also introduced in 1938. The same Ford V8 emblem was mounted just above the radiator grille, see example shown below:

Ford COE truck with grille and hood side emblems (1938) carbuffs

Close up showing Ford V8 COE grille emblem (1938) 

1938 Ford trucks also displayed the "Ford" name on emblems mounted on the hood sides of trucks with hoods and on the body sides of cab over engine trucks, as seen in the examples shown above. These Ford truck hood side or body side emblems were marked with the engine size, either 60 hp or 85 hp, see the Ford V8 85 hp engine sized truck emblem shown below:

This is a Ford V8 85 hp emblem (1938-1939)   lktec
Size: 143mm wide 86mm high   

1938 Ford trucks fitted with the optional 95 hp Mercury V8 engine, had hood side or body side emblems marked "95", see example shown below. This Ford V8 95 hp emblem is scarce.

This is a Ford V8 95 hp hood side emblem (1939)    dnc
Size: 143mm wide 86mm high 

For 1939, Ford pickups and trucks with hoods no longer carried a grill emblem but continued to display the same Ford hood side emblems. Ford COE truck models continued to use the 1938 Ford truck grille and body side emblems. 

Ford pickups in the 1938-1940 period had "Ford" and "V8" stamped into the center of the rear panel, see example shown below:

Ford V8 pickup rear panel emblem (1940)    ms

The Ford pickup for 1940 displayed blue painted "Ford" scripts integral with the lower hood trim casting above the radiator grille and the engine size displayed on the top front of the vertical diecast chrome hood ornament, see 95 hp example shown below:

This shows the Ford pickup hood emblems (1940)  autotrader  

Ford 1-ton 1940 models with hoods also had "V8" pressed into the front of the hood sides and rectangular "One Ton" hood side plates, see example shown below:

Ford V8 truck showing hood/grille and hood side emblems (1940)  blueovaltrucks

1940 Ford COE trucks displayed a diecast winged emblem on the front panel above the grille with the engine size identified, either 85 hp or 95 hp, see 95 hp example shown below:

Ford COE 95 hp V8 truck hood emblem (1940)  ford-trucks

The 1941 Ford truck models displayed the "Ford" name in block letters on the vertical chrome trim piece above the grille on both hooded and COE models, see example shown below:

Ford truck hood trim emblem (1941)    ms

Ford COE truck models continued to use this hood trim emblem in 1942 and again in 1946 when production resumed after the Second World War and through 1947.

1941 Ford truck models also displayed the "Ford" name painted in blue on diecast chrome rectangular hood or body side nameplates, see example shown below. COE model had the same body side nameplate in 1942 also.

Ford V8 truck hood/body side nameplate (1941-1942)  ms

Ford pickups from 1941 to about 1952 had the "Ford" name script only stamped into the center of the tailgate, see example shown below:

Ford pickup tailgate emblem (1941-1952) packautomotivemuseum

There was a different Ford truck grille emblem for 1942 for trucks with hoods. The "Ford" name was displayed in block letters on the horizontal lower hood trim casting, see example shown below:

Ford truck showing hood emblem (1942)   flickr

Close up showing hood trim emblem (1942)   flickr

The following shows an example of a Ford military truck emblem used during the Second World War:

Ford F601 military truck (1942)   mapleleafup

The following are examples of Ford truck emblems when production resumed in 1946 after the Second World War:

Ford one-ton truck with same emblem as 1942 Ford truck model (1946)  blueovaltrucks

Ford V8 Super Deluxe Van (1946)   hemmings

Close up showing the Ford truck grille emblem (1946)

Ford V8 pickup grille emblem (1946)    ms 

Ford COE trucks carried the same emblems as shown for 1941 when production resumed in 1946 and continued until 1948.

The Ford F Series was introduced in 1948 with a new grill emblem used from 1948 through 1950. Ford trucks both with hoods and COE models carried the "Ford" name in block letters horizontally just above the radiator grille, see examples shown below:

Ford COE Series F-6 truck showing Ford grille emblem & hood side nameplate (1948)  flickr 

Ford V8 Series F-5 truck showing grille emblem & hood side nameplate (1950) garyalannelson

I am grateful to Dennis Neilsen for his helpful advice regarding the dates of use of Ford commercial emblems. Any errors in my interpretation of this advice is entirely down to me.