January 10, 2021

STANDISH

Luxor Cab Manufacturing Co. (1924-1925)

Framingham, Massachusetts


This is a Standish radiator emblem (1924-1925)    mjs
Size: 66mm high 55mm wide   MM: Robbins

The Standish motor car was built by the Luxor Cab Manufacturing Company, makers of the Luxor taxicab.

The Standish was a luxury car with brass trim powered by a six-cylinder Continental engine. Manufacture of the Standish began in mid-1924 at the R H Long Motor Car Company plant in Framingham, Massachusetts, where the Bay State car had been built.

It is reported that production of the Standish was limited to one sedan and, possibly, one open car. 

Emblem

The blue and white enamel radiator emblem shown above is extremely rare.

PARTIN-PALMER

Partin Manufacturing Co. & Palmer Motor Car Co. (1913)

Detroit, Michigan & Chicago, Illinois

Partin-Palmer Motor Car Co. (1914)

Chicago, Illinois

Commonwealth Motors Co. (1915-1917)

Rochelle, Illinois


This is a Partin-Palmer radiator emblem (1914-1916)      mjs
Size: 132mm wide 44mm high      MM: Unknown

In June 1913 the Partin Manufacturing Company, a large automobile sales agency in Chicago, joined up with the Palmer Motor Car Company, which had built some prototype cars called Palmer in Detroit, to produce an automobile to be called Partin-Palmer. A few cars were initially built in Detroit but by 1914 the Partin-Palmer Motor Car Company had been set up and all manufacture had moved to a plant in Chicago.

The Partin-Palmer was a four-cylinder touring car, initially offered in 38 hp and 45 hp engine sizes in 1913. The 45 hp model was dropped for 1914 and in 1915 a smaller 20 hp roadster was offered. A 45 hp eight-cylinder six-passenger touring model appeared briefly in 1916, although few were sold.

By 1915 the company was in trouble and the Commonwealth Motor Company became the sales agency for Partin-Palmer and production moved to Rochelle. In late 1917 the Partin-Palmer was renamed the Commonwealth. 

Emblems

I have not seen a Palmer emblem from 1913. If you have any information about a Palmer emblem, please let me know, in order to update this post.

By 1914, the Partin-Palmer carried a large white and blue enamel radiator emblem, see example above at the top of this post. This Partin-Palmer radiator emblem is extremely rare.

During the transition from Partin-Palmer to Commonwealth in 1916-1917, Partin-Palmer cars carried a Commonwealth Partin-Palmer radiator emblem, see the illustration below from the 1916 brochure for the Partin-Palmer Model 32:

This illustration of the Model 32 shows a Commonwealth Partin-Palmer radiator emblem (1916)   sfam

This is the blue enamel Commonwealth Partin-Palmer radiator emblem shown below. This Commonwealth Partin-Palmer radiator emblem is very rare:


This is a Commonwealth Partin-Palmer radiator emblem (1916-1917)     mjs
Size: 76mm wide 30mm high       MM: Unknown

Although only a small number of cars carried this emblem, a batch of unused Commonwealth Partin-Palmer emblems was found later and most Commonwealth Partin-Palmer emblems that I have seen are unused "new old stock" emblems.

RUXTON

New Era Motors, Inc. (1929-1930)
St. Louis, Missouri & Hartford, Wisconsin


This is a Ruxton radiator emblem (1929-1930)   mjs
Size: 84mm wide 68mm high     MM: Fox

William Muller developed a front-wheel-drive prototype car in late 1928 while he was working at the Budd car body manufacturing company. The car was to be called the Ruxton. Archie Andrews was a board member at Budd and decided to produce the Ruxton himself. He organized New Era Motors in April 1929 and then looked for a suitable factory to build the car. In November 1929 it was announced that the car would be built at the Moon factory in St. Louis.

There followed a fight between the original Moon management and the new management that Archie Andrews wanted to install, including William Muller as president. By June 1930, after a court action, Andrews was in control at Moon and the Ruxton was built alongside the Windsor in St. Louis, Missouri (see Windsor) and, at the same time, the Ruxton was being built alongside the Kissel in Hartford, Wisconsin (see Kissel). Kissel went into receivership later in 1930 to avoid the company falling into the hands of Andrews. As Kissel was to manufacture the final drive assemblies and transmissions for all the Ruxtons, production of the Ruxton ceased.

Moon had no cash left and went into receivership and no further Ruxton cars were built. Total production of the Ruxton was about 500 cars only 25 of which were built at Kissel. Some of the Ruxton cars built but not sold previously were finally sold in 1932. A few special custom-built cars were made but most Ruxtons were roadsters or sedans. The Ruxton was an excellent car and strikingly handsome, especially the sedans, some of which sported multi-coloured striped paint schemes.

Emblems

The Ruxton carried a large blue and black enamel radiator emblem with a stylized rendering of a griffin, see example shown above at the top of this post. This Ruxton radiator emblem is extremely rare.

The Ruxton radiator emblem is much sought after by emblem collectors. But, emblem collectors should take great care, as there are reproduction Ruxton emblems, which are not only very closely similar to the original Ruxton radiator emblem but which also display Fox maker's marks. Original Ruxton emblems have a flat head slotted screw soldered to the back of the emblem, see example shown below, so if a Ruxton emblem has a different fixing stud, it is certainly a reproduction. However, there are other differences and comparison with a known original is the best way to identify a reproduction Ruxton emblem. 

Fixing screw on an original Ruxton emblem

The Ruxton radiator emblem was mounted in a specially molded space at the top of the radiator, as shown below:

Ruxton emblem attached to the radiator shell (1930)   bonhams

The Ruxton griffin motif was also applied to the Ruxton hubcaps, bumper emblems and tail lights, see examples shown below:

Ruxton hubcap showing griffin motif (1930)  bonhams

Ruxton bumper emblem showing griffin motif (1930)  rmsothebys

Ruxton tail light showing griffin motif (1930)   rmsothebys






DOBLE

Abner Doble (1913)

Doble Motor Vehicle Co. (1914)

Waltham, Massachusetts

General Engineering Co. (1916)

Doble-Detroit Steam Motors Co. (1917-1918)

Detroit, Michigan

Merged with Amalgamated Machinery Co. (1919)

Chicago, Illinois

Doble Motors Inc. (1921)

Doble Steam Motor Car Corp. (1922-1932)

San Francisco, California


This is a Doble Detroit radiator emblem (1917-1918)     sam
Size: 58mm wide 58mm high    MM: Unknown

Abner Doble was interested in steam propulsion and built his first steam car at high school. He studied engineering at M.I.T. and while in Massachusetts in 1913, he built his first Model A steam car, which had a twin-cylinder double-acting single-expansion engine with water tube boiler and a Harrison cellular radiator which condensed all the exhaust steam. The Stanley brothers could not believe the efficiency of the Doble steam car. The Doble is said to have been the most advanced and efficient steamer anywhere. Abner Doble built five Model A's and four were sold.

In October 1914, Doble established the Doble Motor Vehicle Company to produce a more refined Model B. But Doble lacked the finance and took his prototype to Detroit where C. L. Lewis took an interest and the General Engineering Company was set up in 1916 to build the Model C, called the G.E.C. Doble. The new car had a host of technical improvements and new features, including electric ignition, and was introduced at the New York Automobile Show. The G.E.C. Doble and was a great success. Over 11,000 orders were received but no sooner had the assembly started than it was shut  down due to wartime restrictions on steel allocation. 

Doble reorganized as the Doble-Detroit Steam Motors Company in 1917 to produce the Doble-Detroit. However, very few Doble-Detroit cars were produced and, following a merger with the Amalgamated Machinery Company in Chicago, Abner Doble got frustrated and moved to San Francisco, where in 1921 Doble Motors Incorporated was set up to produce the Doble Model D. In 1922 he reorganized the company into Doble Steam Motor Car Company and continued to improve his car design until in 1923 a factory was set up in Emeryville and production began on the Doble Series E cars in eight body styles by Murphy and with very high price tags. This meant a select and wealthy clientele.

Plans were made to increase production but a series of problems and lack of finance put a stop to this. The Dobles carried on by themselves making the Model E to order and in 1931 introduced the Model F but none were sold as the stock market crash finished the Doble. Probably no more than 45 Doble steam cars were ever built. Doble also made a few steam trucks in San Francisco between 1918 and 1921.

Emblems

I have not seen any Doble emblems for the first Model A and Model B cars built in Massachusetts and perhaps these cars did not have an emblem. I also have not seen am emblem for the Doble Model C, a few of which would have been produced before the War stopped production. If you have details of any Doble emblems made for these early Doble cars, please let me know in order to update this post. 

The Doble-Detroit did carry an emblem, see the black and white enamel Doble-Detroit radiator emblem shown above at the top of this post. This Doble-Detroit radiator emblem is very rare.

The Doble-Detroit also displayed the name on the hubcaps, see example below. This Doble-Detroit hub emblem is rare.

This is a Doble-Detroit hub emblem (1917-1918)      mjs
Size: 56mm diameter      MM: None

I have not seen any other Doble emblems after the Doble-Detroit until the Doble steam cars produced in California. These later Doble steam cars did not have a radiator emblem but did have the Doble name on the hub caps, see examples shown below. 

This is a Doble steam car hub emblem (1925)       nc

The Doble steam car hub emblem shown below is scarce.

This is a Doble Series E hub emblem (c1930)     mjs
Size: 70mm diameter    MM: None







FEDERAL

Bailey Motor Truck Co. (1910)
Federal Motor Truck Co. (1910-1952)
Federal Motor Truck Div. Federal Fawick Corp. (1952-1954)
Detroit, Michigan
Federal Motor Truck Co. Div. Napco Industries Inc. (1955-1959)
Minneapolis, Minnesota


This is a Federal radiator emblem (1926-1932)    mjs
Size: 225mm wide 66mm high     MM: D L Auld


The Federal was an assembled truck throughout its long history. Everything Federal did was in line with industry practices and met their slogan "Never an experiment". The Bailey Motor Truck Company was formed in 1910 but the company was soon reorganized as the Federal Motor Truck Company and the first truck built was called a Federal. The first models used four-cylinder engines and double chain drive. The Federal was very successful and had built its 1000th truck by 1913 and was exporting to twenty countries. By 1923 Federal truck production totaled over 27,000 units. Bus chassis for 18 and 25 passengers were also offered.

In June 1924, Federal introduced the Willys-Knight engine to the motor truck industry and six-cylinder Federal truck models appeared in 1926.The Federal Knight model was continued until 1928. All Federals were conventional trucks until cab-overs were added to the range for 1937. By the mid-1930's, the era of streamlining had arrived and the Federal fleet had the latest styling and the full Federal range included 18 models with 99 different wheelbases. The largest Federal was a 6-ton unit.

Federal trucks continued to develop over the years following the Second World War, reaching a peak production of over 6,000 units in 1947 but then production began to reduce with changes in the market. Federal production came to an end in March 1959 with a lifetime production of about 160,000 trucks.

Emblems

Whereas many original period photos of the earliest Federal trucks from 1910 to 1912 show no external identification, some early Federal trucks did display the "Federal" name on the front of the brass radiator tank top, see examples shown below:

Federal truck showing radiator emblem (1910)   dpl

Close-up showing Federal radiator emblem (1910) 

Federal truck showing radiator emblem (1912)    dpl

The Federal radiator emblems shown above are slightly different in style and, as stated earlier, they not appear on all Federal trucks in this period, so were not an integral part of the radiator. These radiator "emblems" were presumably made using decals or by painting through stencils.

Early Federal trucks would have displayed the "Federal" name on small maker's nameplates and serial plates attached to the body of the vehicle and also on the hubcaps, see hubcap example below:

This is an early Federal hubcap (c1911)     dkc

Seen in Federal truck advertisements from 1911 and in original photos from 1912, Federal trucks from this period also displayed the "Federal" name on what appear to be cast alloy body side nameplates mounted below the seat, see example shown below. These Federal body side nameplates were used from 1911 to about 1915.

Federal truck showing body side nameplate (1912)     dpl

Federal truck advertisements from 1913 and original photos show Federal trucks displaying the "Federal" name on brass radiator scripts with the capital letters of the word "FEDERAL" linked together, see examples shown below. This script style was a registered trademark and was used as the Federal logo.

Federal truck ad with radiator script (1913)   atj

Federal truck showing a radiator script (1914)  worthpoint

The following small Federal nameplate uses the logo and was likely to have been displayed inside Federal trucks from about late 1913. This Federal truck nameplate is rare.

This is a Federal truck maker's nameplate (c1913)    mjs
Size: 58mm wide 22mm high

From about 1915 to 1925, Federal trucks had a new radiator with the "Federal" name cast into the radiator tank top, see example shown below:

Federal truck with cast in radiator emblem (1916)    hatm

Close-up showing cast in radiator emblem (1916) 

Some Canadian Federal models in the period about 1916 to 1925 had "Another Federal" stenciled in white letters on the upper hood panels, see example shown below:

Federal truck displaying hood side nameplate (1919) 
searcharchives.vancouver.ca

This slogan was used to advertise Federal trucks from as early as 1913, see 1914 example shown below:

"Another Federal" advertisement (1914)  detroitfreepress

Some Federal models in the period from about 1916 to 1925 displayed the "Federal" name on pressed metal body side panels below the driver's seat, see example shown below:

Federal truck displaying body side nameplate (1922)   pnwtm

The "Federal" name was also displayed on a Federal nameplate mounted on the rear chassis cross member from about 1915 to 1925 and possibly later, see restored example shown below:

Rear chassis cross frame nameplate (c1915) 

The following is a different rear chassis cross frame Federal nameplate. This Federal nameplate is scarce.

Federal rear chassis cross frame nameplate (c1915-1925) mjs
Size: 532mm wide 112mm high   MM: None

The Federal Knight introduced in 1924 carried an oval shaped, blue and white enamel radiator emblem, see example shown below. This Federal Knight radiator emblem is rare.

This is a Federal-Knight radiator emblem (1924-1926)  mjs
Size: 78mm wide 51mm high    MM: Unknown (poss D L Auld)

Federal models using conventional engines in the same period carried an oval shaped blue and white enamel Federal radiator emblem, see example shown below. This Federal radiator emblem is rare.

This is a Federal radiator emblem (1924-1927)    mjs
Size:78mm wide 51mm high   MM: Unknown (poss D L Auld)

Federal trucks in this period also displayed the "Federal" name on hood side nameplates showing the model names, such as Federal Knight, Federal Scout and others. The first "Federal Scout" and "Federal Big Six" hood side nameplates were finished in blue and white enamel but later examples are in painted thin metal nameplates, see examples shown below:

This is an enamel Federal Big Six hood side nameplate (c1926) ms
Size: Unknown

This is a painted Federal Big Six hood side nameplate (c1928) mjs
Size: 550mm wide 64mm high

This is a Federal Scout Six hood side nameplate (c1928)  mjs
Size: 383mm wide 42mm high

A new aluminum radiator shell was introduced for the 1926 model year with the "Federal" name impressed into the radiator tank top, see example shown below:

Federal truck with aluminum rad & embossed emblem   flickr

Federal radiator top showing embossed emblem (1926-1927)   ms

This radiator was also used on some Federal Knight models in 1926-1927, which also displayed "Federal Knight" hood side nameplates.

Federal-Knight logo (1925)    ms

A new Federal radiator emblem was used from 1926 to 1932 on most medium and heavy duty Federal truck models. This is the large blue and white enamel Federal truck radiator emblem shown below. This Federal truck radiator emblem is scarce.

This is a Federal truck radiator emblem (1926-1932)  mjs
Size: 225mm wide 66mm high   MM: D L Auld

A smaller version of this Federal truck emblem was used on lighter duty Federal truck models, including some 1926-1927 Federal Scout models, see example shown above at the top of this post and again below. This Federal truck radiator emblem is rare.

This is a Federal truck radiator emblem (1926-1932)  mjs
Size: 159mm wide 51mm high   MM: D L Auld

The following shows the size difference between these emblems:

Federal truck radiator emblems size comparison    mjs

The "Federal" name was also displayed on painted Federal hood side nameplates with rounded corners, see example shown below:

Federal truck showing hood side nameplate (1932) heritagepark.ca

Close-up showing hood side nameplate (1932)

There was another change in the Federal truck radiator emblem design in 1933, see the black and white enamel Federal radiator grille emblem shown below. This Federal radiator emblem is scarce.

This is a Federal truck radiator emblem (1933-1936)   mjs
Size: 83mm wide 33mm high    MM: D L Auld

The following is a black and white painted version of the previous Federal truck radiator emblem. This Federal truck radiator emblem is believed to have been used for 1936 only and is rare.

This is a Federal truck radiator emblem (1936)    mjs
Size: 81mm wide 33mm high    MM: D L Auld

The "Federal" name was also displayed on hood side nameplates, see examples shown below:

This is a Federal hood side nameplate (1933-1935) lktec
Size: 305mm wide 52mm high   MM: Unknown

This is a Federal hood side nameplate (1936-1937)   ms
Size: 295mm wide 45mm high   MM: Unknown

Federal trucks did not carry a radiator emblem or 1937 but did display the "Federal" name on a die-cast pennant hood ornament, see example shown below. This Federal hood ornament was also used on Federal cab over engine models for 1938-1940.

This is a Federal truck hood ornament (1937-1940)    ms

Light and medium duty Federal trucks displayed the "Federal" name on a die cast chrome trim strip emblem on the upper front of the radiator grille from 1938-1950, see examples shown below. There were some variations in detail over the period.

Federal flat bed truck with grille emblem (1947)   mecum

Federal grille emblem (1938-1950) lktec
Size: 145mm high 22mm wide  MM: Unknown

The following Federal truck detail from a Federal advertisement shows a different style of the Federal grille emblem:

Federal heavy duty truck grille emblem (1938)     eBay   

From 1939, heavy duty Federal truck models displayed a die cast hood ornament mounted on the top of the radiator grille, see example shown below:

Federal heavy duty truck hood ornament (1939-1953)  ms

From 1939, the "Federal" name was also displayed on a round emblem mounted on the leading edge of hood side panels on light and medium duty models to 1950 and heavy duty models to 1953, see example shown below:

Federal truck hood side emblem (1947)   mecum

This is the circular pressed metal, painted Federal hood side emblem shown below:

This is a Federal hood side emblem (1938-1953)   mjs
Size: 112mm diameter    MM: None

Some heavy duty Federal military recovery vehicles carried a cast metal radiator grille emblem, see example shown below:

Federal Model C-2 wrecker truck with rad emblem (c1945) wiki

This is the painted Federal radiator grille emblem shown below. This Federal radiator grille emblem is rare.

This is a Federal radiator grille emblem (c1940-1945)  lktec
Size: 157mm wide 46mm high   MM: Unknown

From 1950 to 1954, restyled Skyliner Federal models displayed a painted die cast "F" grille emblem, see example shown below:

Federal Skyliner truck with "F" emblem (1954)   brc

Close-up showing Federal "F" emblem (1950-1954)