February 13, 2019

SCRIPPS-BOOTH

Scripps-Booth Cyclecar Co. (1912-1914)

Scripps-Booth Co. (1914-1922)

Detroit, Michigan


This is a Scripps-Booth radiator emblem (1914-1922)     mjs
Size: 44mm diameter  MM: Bastian Bros

James Scripps-Booth was the designer of several interesting motor vehicles. His first was the Bi-Autogo, which was a three-seater vehicle that was rather like a massive elongated motorcycle. The Bi-Autogo was powered by a 75 hp V-8 engine and could travel at speeds of up to 75mph. It had auxiliary stabilizing wheels to ensure stability at speeds below 20mph. Booth's V-8 engine was the first built in Detroit and was three years ahead of the Cadillac V-8. The prototype, which was completed in 1912, cost $25,000 and did not go into production.

The next idea of James Scripps-Booth was a tandem-seat cyclecar called the Rocket and a light delivery version called the Packet. Both were powered by a 10 hp two-cylinder engine and went into production in 1914. It was an exemplary cyclecar but after producing 400 units production was discontinued because by 1914 the fashion for cyclecars was over in America. But Scripps-Booth was already planning his next creation, a luxurious light car.

The Scripps-Booth Company was established in late 1914. The first car was a three-seat 18 hp four-cylinder roadster which was in production in early 1915 with a coupe model available later that year. The Scripps-Booth was an excellent car and was bought for the Queen of Holland, the King of Spain and Winston Churchill in England. A 35 hp V-8 model was introduced in 1916 and a 40 hp six-cylinder model appeared in 1918. But there were some reliability problems with the Scripps-Booth and decisions made by the company after it went public upset James Scripps-Booth and he left the company.

By the end of 1917 the Scripps-Booth had been absorbed by Chevrolet and became part of General Motors but was discontinued in 1922 after a total production of 60,000 cars. James Scripps-Booth had by now thought up a new and innovative automobile design to be called the Da Vinci.

Emblem

The Scripps-Booth white, red and black enamel radiator emblem shown above is scarce, as is the red painted Scripps-Booth hub emblem shown below:

This is a Scripps-Booth hub emblem (1914-1922)    mjs
Size:57mm diameter  MM: None


JEFFERY

Thomas B. Jeffery Co. (1914-1917)

Kenosha, Wisconsin


This is a Jeffery radiator emblem (1914-1917)     mjs
Size: 63mm diameter     MM: Unknown

In the early years of the twentieth century Thomas B. Jeffery had constructed the largest and best equipped automobile factory in America and had built the Rambler (see Rambler), which became one of the most successful automobiles in America. Thomas Jeffery died of a heart attack in 1910 while on holiday in Italy and his son, Charles Jeffery, tool over as the company president. In 1914, Charles Jeffery took a risky decision and changed the name of his car from Rambler to Jeffery in honor of his father.

The Jeffery of 1914 was an entirely new car offered as two four-cylinder models and a six-cylinder model. Jeffery also built a range of delivery wagons and trucks, the most famous of which was the Jeffery Quad truck. Production for 1914 was 10,417 Jeffery cars and 3,096 Jeffery Quads. Things were going well but, in anticipation that America would be drawn into the First World War, Charles Jeffery decided to concentrate more and more on trucks.

Charles Jeffery left America for a trip to Europe in 1915. He sailed on the S.S. Lusitania, which was sunk by German torpedoes. Luckily, Charles survived but the experience led him to retire in 1916. He sold his company to Charles Nash and by 1917 the Jeffery name was finished.

Emblems

Although the Rambler did not have a radiator emblem, the Jeffery carried a blue, red and white enamel radiator emblem from the start, see example above at the top of this post. This Jeffery radiator emblem is rare, even though there were several thousand Jeffery cars built.

The Jeffery advertisement for 1916 shows a very different radiator emblem, see below: 

This is part of a Jeffery ad showing a new radiator emblem (1916-1917)   ms

The new Jeffery radiator emblem was intended to be used for the Jeffery Six and was advertised as "a symbol of mechanical precision and refinement". The blue, white and orange enamel Jeffery Six radiator emblem shown below is extremely rare.

This is a Jeffery Six radiator emblem (1916-1917)     sam
Size: 70mm high 61mm wide      MM: Unknown

I am not sure what the following Jeffery emblem was used for. It may have been a hub emblem. If you have details, please let me know in order to update this post. This Jeffery emblem is scarce.

This may be a Jeffery hub emblem (1914-1917)     mjs
Size: 60mm diameter   MM: None






February 07, 2019

DAVIS (1)

George W. Davis Motor Car Co. (1908-1928)

Automotive Corp. of America (1928-1929)

Richmond, Indiana


This is a Davis radiator emblem (1926-1928)     mjs
Size: 77mm wide 38mm high   MM: Unknown

George W. Davis was a well established buggy wagon builder when he established the George W. Davis Motor Car Company in 1908 and his first cars were simply motorized buggies. The Davis became a 35 hp four-cylinder motor car in 1911 and was offered in touring and five-passenger torpedo styles. A six-cylinder model was also introduced in 1914. From 1916 only six-cylinder models were offered until 1927 when an eight-cylinder model appeared. The cars were successful with good sales in America and overseas.

The Davis was a well built assembled car offered in a wide range of body styles and attractive two-tone paint schemes. After 1920 the Davis began to lose its market position and sales began to suffer. In February 1928 the company was taken over by the Automotive Corporation of America but only a few cars were made that year before production ceased.

Emblems

The first Davis motor buggies are unlikely to have carried an emblem but may have had a small maker's nameplate/serial plate.

The first Davis cars in 1911 had a blue and white radiator emblem, see example below. This Davis radiator emblem is extremely rare.

This is the first Davis radiator emblem (1911-c1914)     sam
Size: 77mm wide 38mm high     MM: Unknown

The Davis name was also displayed on the hub caps. The 1912 advertisement shown below has a photo of a Davis 40 showing a radiator emblem and named hub caps. The detail is not very clear but it can be seen that the hub caps had the name "DAVIS" in block letters:

This is a Davis ad showing a radiator emblem (1912)     tha

The Davis radiator emblem design was changed in about 1914 to include a red ribbon along the bottom of the emblem showing the company name and location, see example below. This particular Davis radiator emblem is unusual and extremely rare.

This is a thin curved Davis radiator emblem (1914)      dnc
Size: 77mm wide 38mm high     MM: None

The metal base of this radiator emblem is very thin and the emblem is curved left to right. It appears to have been specially made to fit a concave shaped radiator before enameling. The Davis Six Fifty model built for 1914 is the only Davis car with a concave shaped radiator and is believed to have carried the radiator emblem shown above, see Davis Six Fifty ad shown below:

This is a Davis Six Fifty ad showing a concave shaped radiator and emblem (1914)   tma

The more usual Davis radiator emblem with this design uses a thicker metal base, is domed but was made to fit onto a flat radiator. It can be found in plain metal or plated, see example below. This Davis radiator emblem is rare and may have been used on flat radiator models at the same time as the curved radiator emblem described earlier or shortly thereafter. This Davis radiator emblem continued in use until 1925.


This is a Davis radiator emblem (c1914-1925)      mjs
Size: 77mm wide 38mm high     MM: Early None (later D L Auld)

Beware, as there is a Pulfer reproduction of this Davis radiator emblem, which is flat rather than domed, has no maker's mark and has a bright orange-red band at the bottom.

The Davis hub caps followed the radiator emblem design, see example below:

This is the Davis hubcap design (c1914-1925)    dkc

In 1926 the Davis radiator emblem design was changed to a domed, plated metal emblem with the Davis name finished in blue enamel, see example above at the top of this post. This Davis radiator was used until Davis production ceased in 1928. Relatively few Davis cars were built using this emblem and most examples of this emblem appear to be unused new-old stock emblems. This Davis radiator emblem is scarce.









HERRESHOFF

Herreshoff Motor Corp. (1909-1914)

Detroit, Michigan


This is a Herreshoff radiator emblem (dates uncertain)      mjs
Size: 64mm diameter    MM: None

The first Herreshoff automobiles appeared in 1909. They were small cars powered by 24 hp four-cylinder Herreshoff marine engines. A stripped Herreshoff roadster won the five mile stock chassis race at the Indianapolis Speedway in 1910.

For 1911 the Herreshoff range extended to 25 hp and 30 hp four-cylinder models and a 40 hp six-cylinder model was added for 1913. But Herreshoff was in trouble and suffered a variety of problems. Lack of finance was the most serious problem and by May 1914 the company was finished.

Emblems

The Herreshoff Motor Corporation could not settle on a logo. Several different logo designs appeared in Herreshoff advertisements.

In 1909 advertisements, the Herreshoff logo appears as a capital letter "H" with curved verticals in a double circle, see example below:

This is a Herreshoff  advertisement for 1909     ms

The Herreshoff sill plate shown below shows a logo with the same letter "H" but inside a single circle. It seems likely that this sill plate was used on the first Herreshoff cars in 1909. This Herreshoff sill plate is very rare.

This is a Herreshoff sill plate (c1909)     mjs
Size: 213mm wide 32mm high

I do not know, if the first Herreshoff in 1909 carried an emblem or a radiator script showing the same or a similar logo. If there was a Herreshoff emblem with this logo, it would be very rare.

Advertisements in 1911 make the "National Champion" reference to the success of Herreshoff at the 1910 Indianapolis Speedway and display a different logo, showing a capital letter "H" with a raised horizontal bar, all inside a diamond and surrounded by a double circle, see example below. 


This is a Herreshoff advertisement for 1911     ms

The Herreshoff car shown in the 1911 advertisement above has a radiator emblem. I do not know, if this emblem has the same logo design with the letter "H" with the raised horizontal bar shown in the advertisement. If this radiator emblem does exist, it would be very rare.

Advertisements in 1912, show yet another version of the Herreshoff logo with a different style of the letter "H", see example below:

This is a Herreshoff advertisement for 1912     ms

I have never seen a Herreshoff radiator emblem with this style of logo. If this emblem exists, it would be very rare.

The radiator emblem shown above at the top of this post was certainly used on Herreshoff cars. It has a simple letter "H" within a diamond and enclosed by a double circle. The emblem is a simple brass disc and is scarce. 

It is possible that this was the only Herreshoff radiator emblem, but I cannot confirm this, because of the variety of Herreshoff logos in different advertisements. If you have details or photos of other Herreshoff emblems, please let me know in order to update this post.

The same simple logo appears on the larger diameter Herreshoff hub emblem, see example below. This Herreshoff hub emblem is scarce.


This is a Herreshoff hub emblem (dates uncertain)     mjs
Size: 89mm diameter    MM: None








January 19, 2019

PRINCESS

Princess Cyclecar Co. (1914)

Princess Motor Car Corp. (1914-1918)

Detroit, Michigan


This is a Princess radiator emblem (1914-1918)      sam
Size: 45mm high 40mm wide     MM: Unknown

The Princess Cyclecar Company was established in December 1913 to produce a cyclecar called the Little Princess, which appeared in February 1914 as a 12 hp two-cylinder two-passenger roadster. However, cyclecars were losing popularity and later in 1914 the Princess Cyclecar Company was reorganised as the Princess Motor car Company.

The Princess was the Little Princess with a new name. The Princess became a 23 hp four-cylinder motor car for 1916 and was offered as a two-passenger roadster or a five-passenger touring model. A speedster model was added to the line for 1917 and 1918. However, sales did not meet expectations and it was all over for the Princess by the end of 1918.

Emblem

I do not know, if there was an emblem for the Little Princess cyclecar. If you have any information about a Little Princess emblem, please let me know, in order to update this post.

The Princess carried a white, blue and red enamel radiator emblem with a beautiful, crowned Princess above a winged shield, see example shown above. The Princess radiator emblem is very rare.

There is a reproduction Princess emblem made by Pulfer, see below. But this is easily identified as it is crudely made with a flat back, has a very ugly Princess and, most significantly, the emblem carries the name "Prineess" instead of "Princess", no doubt due to a misinterpretation of Harry Pulfer's instruction by his Hong Kong based emblem maker. 

This is a reproduction Princess radiator emblem      ms




REO

Reo Motor Car Co.

Lansing, Michigan (1904-1936)

St. Catherines, Ontario (1910-1913)


This is the first Reo radiator emblem (c1907)     mjs
Size: 155mm wide 45mm high    MM: None

Ransome Eli Olds had set up the Olds Motor Works in 1899 but left the company in 1904 over his disagreement to phase out the curved dash Oldsmobile. He immediately set up a new company called the R.E.Olds Company but the Oldsmobile company objected and Olds renamed his company the Reo Motor Car Company. Olds completed his first Reo motor car in late 1904 and it was introduced at the New York Automobile Show in January 1905.

The first Reo was a 16 hp two-cylinder five-passenger tonneau, which was joined by a 7-1/2 hp single-cylinder runabout. In 1905 a Reo was driven across America twice, the first ever double transcontinental trek by an automobile. A four-cylinder model was offered in 1906 but it was the two-cylinder car that received the most Reo publicity and achieved the best sales. In 1907 Ransome Olds achieved the industries third best sales after Ford and Buick.

Some commercial vehicles were produced earlier but full commercial vehicle production began in 1908 and was to become a very successful business. A new 35 hp four-cylinder Reo car appeared in 1909 and was also a great success. In 1910, Reo established a manufacturing plant in Canada at St. Catherines, Ontario but this venture was finished in 1913.

In 1912 Ransome Olds introduced Reo the Fifth as "The Car That Marks My Limit" and he also said "I call it My Farewell Car". But, this was not the end of the Reo.

In 1916 a fine 45hp six-cylinder model was added to the Reo line. During the First World War Reo was kept busy building trucks for the war effort and remained profitable. Following the war Reo moved to six-cylinder models and the last four-cylinder model was offered in 1919.

The Reo Flying Cloud appeared in 1927 and was successful initially. Some months later a cheaper companion car called the Wolverine was introduced (see Wolverine) but it was superseded in 1929 by a smaller version of the Flying Cloud.

By 1931 the Great Depression saw Reo losing money and then the Royale arrived. The Royale was the most fabulous of all the Reo cars, a 125 hp straight-eight with coachwork by Murray. But by 1934 Reo was in serious financial trouble. Ransome Olds gave up control of the company and in 1936 the Reo company gave up passenger car production and decided to concentrate solely on commercial vehicles (see Reo Trucks).

Emblems

The earliest Reos in 1904 did not carry a metal radiator emblem but may have displayed a "Reo" decal. Ransome Olds had used a colored decal on the curved dash Oldsmobile in 1901, so it is possible that a "Reo" decal was used from 1904 but I cannot confirm this.

The earliest evidence I have found is from 1906. The original factory illustration of a Reo Model A shown below clearly shows a "Reo" body side decal, see below:


This is a factory illustration of a Reo Model A showing a "Reo" decal (1906)    hcg

This is a close up showing the Reo side decal (1906)   hcg

It is noted that there is no emblem or decal on the top of the radiator on the Reo Model A illustration shown above. However, an original 1906 photo of a Reo Model B clearly shows a "Reo" decal on the top of the radiator, see below:

This is an original photo of a  Reo Model B showing a radiator top decal (1906)   hcg

This is a close up showing the radiator top decal (1906)

The following photo shows a restored "Reo" logo on the radiator of a 1906 Reo Model B:

This shows a restored radiator decal on a Reo Model B (1906)      reotm

The first Reo cars also showed the Reo name on the serial plate, which was usually attached to the body under the driver's seat. The Reo serial plate shown below is a very early 1905 plate showing the production number 166. This Reo serial plate is very rare.


This is an early Reo serial plate (1905)      mjs
Size: 83mm wide 38mm high

The Reo serial plate design was changed later in 1905, see example below from 1906. These early Reo serial plates are rare.

This is an early Reo serial plate (1906)    ms

The Reo name was also displayed on the sill plates of some early Reo cars, see example below:

This is a Reo sill plate (c1906)      reotm

Brass scripts were being displayed on the radiator core of motor vehicles in America from as early as 1905 but there is no evidence that they were used on Reo cars at this time. 

There is a photo of a Reo car marked as a factory photo from 1906, which shows a "Reo" radiator script, see photo below:

This is labeled as a Reo factory photo and shows a Reo radiator script (1906)   ms 

However, there is doubt as to whether this is indeed an original factory photo. There are indications that this may be a later photo of a restored 1906 Reo. In any event, I suspect that the Reo radiator script was not in regular use on Reo motor vehicles until after 1907. 

Photos of a Reo car taking part in the 1906 Glidden tour show the name "Reo" painted on the radiator grille, presumably for publicity purposes, see photo below. This would have been unnecessary, if a large brass Reo radiator script had been in regular use at that time.

This is a Reo in the Glidden Tour with the Reo name painted on the radiator core (1906)  dpl

Brass Reo radiator scripts were certainly in use in 1907 and continued in use on Reo cars through 1910 and on Reo trucks until 1916. Reo radiator scripts usually had the letters attached to each other, see example shown below, but some had separated letters. Reo radiator scripts were made in several sizes. Genuine original Reo scripts are scarce. 

This is a brass Reo radiator script (c1907)     mjs
Size: 205mm wide 144mm high

The first Reo radiator emblem was made of brass and probably painted black, see example above at the top of this post. This type of Reo radiator emblem was used on Reo cars from about 1907 and later on Reo trucks. This Reo radiator emblem is scarce.

The following original photo taken in 1907 shows President Teddy Roosevelt riding in a Reo displaying a Reo radiator emblem and radiator script.

This is a Reo car with President Roosevelt (1907)    msua

It is interesting to note that the Reo car following President Roosevelt does not carry a Reo radiator script, suggesting that the Reo radiator script may not have been in regular use even in 1907.

The first Reo radiator emblem finished in enamel was used for the 1910 model year, see example below. This blue and white enamel Reo radiator emblem is extremely rare. But, beware as there are reasonably good reproductions of this emblem but with clean flat backs with no fixing studs. The original emblem has two fixing studs.

This is the first Reo radiator emblem finished in enamel (1910)     mjs
Size: 74mm wide 60mm high    MM: None

The first Canadian Reo used a very similar radiator emblem, see example below. This Canadian Reo radiator emblem is also extremely rare.  

This is the first Canadian Reo radiator emblem (1910)     mjs
Size: 74mm wide 60mm high    MM: None

The Reo radiator emblem shown below is finished in unusual colors and may be a reproduction, but why reproduce an emblem in entirely the wrong colors? The emblem otherwise appears authentic and does not seem to have been recently re-enameled. I have no idea what this Reo emblem was used for. If you have any information about this emblem, please let me know, in order to update this post.

This appears to be a Reo radiator emblem (dates unknown)     sam
Size: 74mm wide 60mm high     MM: Unknown

The down-turned wings on the first enameled Reo radiator emblem produced a rather sad expression, but the emblem design was changed a year later to up-turned wings, which gave a much happier appearance, see example below. This attractive blue, green and white enamel Reo radiator emblem is very rare.

This is a Reo radiator emblem (1911)      mjs
Size: 70mm wide 58mm high      MM: Robbins

I have not seen the Reo emblem shown above marked St Catherines, Ontario but such an emblem may exist and, if so, would be extremely rare. If you have details of such an emblem, please let me know, in order to update this post.

The following Reo radiator emblem was first used in 1912 for the Reo The Fifth. This Reo 
radiator emblem is finished in white, red, white and blue enamel and is scarce. But, beware, there are unmarked die stamped reproductions of this emblem with an internally threaded stud at the back.

This is a Reo The Fifth radiator emblem (1912-1919)     mjs
Size: 78mm wide 58mm high    MM: None

The following photo shows a slightly smaller variation of the Reo The Fifth radiator emblem. 

This is a Reo The Fifth radiator emblem (1912-1919)      mjs
Size: 75mm wide 58mm high    MM: Childs

Since the Reo plant in Ontario was still operating in 1912, it is possible that the Reo The Fifth emblem may also exist marked with the St Catherines location and, if so, it would be extremely rare. If you have details of such an emblem, please let me know.

Reo introduced a six-cylinder model in 1916. The Reo The Six radiator emblem is similar in design to the Reo The Fifth radiator emblem, see example below:

This is a Reo The Six Model M radiator emblem (1916-1918)     mjs
Size: 75mm wide 58mm high    MM: Unknown

The six-cylinder Model T6 introduced in 1920 carried a new radiator emblem finished in white, blue and black enamel, see example below. This Reo radiator emblem is relatively easy to find, as it was used on many Reo car models and the Model F Speedwagon into 1926.

This is a Reo Model T6 radiator emblem (1920-1926)     mjs
Size: 62mm wide 51mm high    MM: Childs

The following Reo radiator emblem is a, possibly later, variation of the emblem shown above: 

This is a Reo Model T6 radiator emblem (1920-1926)      mjs
Size: 62mm wide 51mm high    MM: D L Auld

The six-cylinder Reo Flying Cloud introduced in 1927 displayed a completely new radiator design finished in red and white enamel, see example below. This Reo radiator emblem is relatively easy to find, as it was used on Flying Cloud cars, except the Flying Cloud Mate, from 1927 to 1930.

This is a Reo Flying Cloud radiator emblem (1927-1930)      mjs
Size: 73mm wide 55mm high    MM: Unknown

The very small Reo emblem shown below was a headlight emblem used on the Reo Flying Cloud. This Reo emblem is rare.

This is a Reo Flying Cloud headlamp emblem (1927-1930)    mjs
Size: 25mm wide 17mm high    MM: Unknown

The following Reo Flying Cloud emblem is made of thin brass plate. The motive design has some similarities to that shown on advertisements for the 1927 Reo Flying Cloud sedan but I cannot confirm that the emblem was used on this model. If you can identify this emblem, please let me know in order to update this post.

This is a Reo Flying Cloud emblem (possibly c1927)    mjs
Size: 71mm high 45mm wide   MM: None

The following Reo Flying Cloud brass radiator script may have been a factory optional item or may have been provided by Reo dealers. Original Flying Cloud scripts are scarce.

This is a (damaged) Reo Flying Cloud radiator script (c1928)     mjs
Size: 262mm wide

The following Reo radiator emblem was used on the six-cylinder Reo Flying Cloud Mate from 1929 and on the Reo Flying Cloud Model 15, which replaced the Flying Cloud Mate in 1930 until early in 1931. This Reo radiator emblem, finished in red and white enamel, is scarce.


This is a Reo Flying Cloud Mate radiator emblem (1929-1931)     mjs
Size: 61mm high 32mm wide     MM: Unknown

The following emblem is an ultra rare oddity. It closely resembles the previous Reo radiator emblem and is exactly the same size. It is thought to have been a trial emblem for the Flying Cloud Mate but was not selected for use.

This appears to be a trial Reo Flying Cloud Mate radiator emblem (c1929)    mjs
Size: 61mm high 32mm wide    MM:
 D L Auld

In 1931, a new radiator emblem design finished in black and white enamel was used on Reo Flying Cloud models having a flat radiator, see example below. This Reo radiator emblem is scarce.

This is a Reo Flying Cloud radiator emblem (1931-1934)     mjs
Size: 57mm high 32mm wide    MM: Unknown

Also in 1931, the new Reo Royale had a different radiator design and used a diecast combined emblem/grille ornament, which continued in 1932 also, see example below:

This is a Reo Royale emblem/grille ornament (1931-1932)   supercars.net

Reo Flying Cloud models using the Royale style radiator in 1931 to mid-1932 used a similar combined emblem/grille ornament to the Royale but with "Flying Cloud" lettering. If you have a good photo of the "Flying Cloud" version of this emblem, please send me a copy in order to update this post.

The Reo Royale emblem/grille ornament design was changed in 1933, see example below:

This is a Reo Royale emblem/grille ornament (1933-1936)     ms

The following Reo Royale emblem is believed to have been used as a hood side emblem in 1935 and is rare:

This is believed to be a Reo Royale Model TSS hood side emblem (1935)    mjs
Size: 80mm high 46mm wide    MM: D L Auld

From late 1932 and into 1934, Reo Flying Cloud models utilised the black and white enamel radiator emblem, first introduced in 1931 and shown earlier, but now displayed on a winged diecast upper grille ornament, see example below:

This is a Reo Flying Cloud emblem in a winged base (1932-1933)  albionphoto  

For 1934, the Reo Flying Cloud emblem design was changed to a combined cast emblem and hood ornament, see example below:

This is a Reo Flying Cloud emblem/grille ornament (1934)    alf van beem

There was no radiator emblem on the Reo Flying Cloud for 1935.

For 1936, the final year for Reo passenger cars, Flying Cloud models had a completely new red painted emblem attached to the radiator grille with circular emblems, also finished in red, attached to each side of the hood, see examples below. These Reo emblems are scarce.

This is a Reo Flying Cloud radiator grille emblem (1936)     mjs
Size: 145mm wide 41mm high    MM: Mayer

This is a Reo Flying Cloud hood side emblem (1936)      mjs
Size: 76mm diameter    MM: D L Auld