November 28, 2021

METEOR (3)

Meteor Motors, Inc. (1919-1922)

Philadelphia, Pennsylvania


This is a Meteor radiator emblem (1919-1922)      mjs
Size: 57mm diameter   MM: None

The Meteor built in Philadelphia was a high quality 80 hp four-cylinder automobile and was offered in sport touring and runabout body styles. A town car model was added for 1922. The Meteor was distinguished by a deep vee shaped radiator and the bodies were made by Fleetwood. The Meteor was an expensive automobile and could not survive the post First World War depression. Production ceased in 1922.

Emblem

There are very few photos of the Meteor car made in Philadelphia and none, that I can find, which clearly show an emblem. 

The Meteor had a vee-shaped radiator, which may have carried an emblem at the top of the radiator but I cannot confirm this. Original photos of Meteor cars show what appears to be an emblem mounted on the body side just above the running board, see example shown below:

Meteor two-seater showing possible body side emblem (1919)   atj

The Meteor Motors Inc, emblem is the two-piece, blue and black enamel emblem surmounted by a gold star shown above at the top of this post and is very rare.

The following Meteor brochure dated 1920 refers to Meteor Motors Corporation and not Meteor Motors Inc.:

Meteor Motors Corp brochure (1920) worthpoint

This brochure includes an illustration of a Meteor Motors Corporation emblem, see below:

Meteor Motors Corp brochure page with emblem (1920) worthpoint

Meteor Motors Corp emblem

I can find no details of the Meteor Motors Corporation and I have not seen an emblem inscribed with this company name. If an original emblem could be found inscribed Meteor Motors Corp, it would be extremely rare.

Interestingly, all the Meteor emblems that I have seen appear to be unused.






JEWETT

Jewett Motors, Inc. (1922-1927)

Detroit, Michigan


This is a Jewett radiator emblem (1922-1923)     mjs
Size: 64mm wide 39mmm high     MM: Unknown

Jewett Motors was a subsidiary of the Paige-Detroit Motor Car Company (see Paige) and was established to produce a reasonably priced six-cylinder car to be sold through the Paige dealership network.

The Jewett was an attractive automobile and was immediately popular when introduced in 1922 in touring and sedan body styles. A growing range of body styles was offered in the following years. In January 1927, after the production of over 100,000 cars, the Jewett name was dropped and the car became a model of the Paige.

Emblems

The first Jewett cars in 1922 carried a white and blue enamel radiator emblem, see example shown above.

The Jewett radiator emblem changed slightly over the next few years.

The following white and blue enamel Jewett radiator emblem is believed to be the second Jewett radiator emblem:

This is a Jewett radiator emblem (1924-1926)     mjs
Size: 64mm wide 40mm high    MM: Fox

The following white and blue enamel Jewett radiator emblem was the final Jewett emblem:

This is a Jewett radiator emblem (1926-1927)     mjs
Size: 60mm wide 34mm high   MM: Unknown (poss Fox)













NEW ERA (2)

New Era Motors Corp. (1933-1934)

New York, New York


This is a New Era bumper emblem (1933-1934)     mjs
Size: 80mm high 64mm wide   

The New Era produced by New Era Motors Corporation used a Ford chassis and bodies by LeBaron. The New Era was offered as a seven-passenger sedan, a limousine and, most successfully, as a taxi cab.

Emblem

The New Era did not carry a radiator emblem but did have a painted cast metal emblem fitted to the front bumper, see example above. This New Era emblem is rare.




PAK-AGE-CAR

Package Car Corp. (1926-1932)
Chicago, Illinois
Stutz Motor Car Co. of America, Inc. (1932-1938)
Indianapolis, Indiana
Pak-Age-Car Corp., Auburn Central Co. (1938-1941)
Connersville, Indiana
Diamond T Motor Car Co. (1939-1941)
Chicago, Illinois


This is a Stutz Pak-Age-Car emblem (c1937)     mjs
Size: 205mm wide 65mm high    MM: None

The first Pak-Age-Car was called the Pac-Kar and was a simple, compact walk-in delivery van. The first vans were box-shaped with a wheel in each corner and the driver drove from a standing position. Production began in 1926 in Chicago. Few were made due to financial difficulties and in 1932 the business was bought by Stutz, who modernized the design and the result was the Stutz Pak-Age-Car. Production was moved to the Stutz plant in Indianapolis.

Then Stutz too had financial problems and filed for bankruptcy in 1937. The rights to the Pak-Age-Car and tooling were sold to the Auburn Central Manufacturing Corporation, who established the new Pak-Age-Car Corporation in 1938. 

Auburn did not have a sales or servicing organisation and, from 1939, sales and servicing of the Pak-Age-Car was handled by Diamond T, while the manufacturing took place in Auburn's Connersville plant in Indiana. However, Auburn was awarded contacts to build Jeep bodies and aircraft wings for the war effort and Pak-Age-Car production was discontinued in March 1941.

Emblems

There are few original photos of the Pak-Age-Car and even less showing any emblems, so assessing dates is difficult.

I have not seen an emblem for the first Pac-Kar models and I suspect that there were no emblems, as this design was truly basic and cheap. 

The first Stutz Pak-Age-Cars from 1933 also had no emblem but used a "Pak-Age-Car" logo, as shown on the brochure illustration shown below:

This is a Stutz Pak-Age-Car showing the logo (1933) 

This logo and the Stutz logo were displayed on the hub caps on production models, see examples shown below:

This is a Stutz Pak-Age-Car hub emblem (1933-1938)    mjs
Size: 80mm diameter    MM: None

This is a Stutz Pak-Age-Car hub emblem (1933-1938)   mjs
Size: 80mm diameter    MM: None

The red and black painted Stutz Pak-Age-Car emblem shown above at the top of this post appeared in 1937 shortly before the Stutz bankruptcy. The emblem may have been intended to be displayed on the front of the vehicle. Very few, if any, were used and most examples I have seen have been unused emblems. This Stutz Pak-Age-Car emblem is rare.

The new Pak-Age-Car produced  by Auburn in 1938-1939 used the logo shown in the 1939 Pak-Age-Car brochure and publicity photo shown below:

This Pak-Age-Car brochure shows the new logo (1939)



Pak-Age-Car publicity photo showing the new logo (1939)

The following Pak-Age-Car emblem displays the new logo. This Pak-Age-Car emblem is scarce.

This is a Pak-Age-Car emblem (c1938-1939)     mjs
Size: 108mm wide 75mm high    MM: None

From later in 1939 until production ceased in 1941, the Pak-Age-Car carried a Diamond-T emblem on the front of the vehicle, see examples shown below: 

This is a Diamond-T Pak-Age-Car (1939)    ms

This is a Diamond-T Pak-Age-Car hood emblem (1939-1941)  mjs
Size: 200mm wide 116mm high     MM: None




SANFORD

Sanford-Herbert Motor Truck Co. (1909-1911)

Sanford-Herbert Co. (1911-1913)
Sanford Motor Truck Co. (1913-1939)
Syracuse, New York
Sanford Fire Apparatus Corp. (1969-c1980)
East Syracuse, New York


This is a Sanford Greyhound truck radiator emblem (1923)  mjs
Size: 76mm diameter   MM: Unknown

The first truck produced by Sanford-Herbert Motor Truck Company was called the Sanbert and was a 1-ton capacity open truck. The company continued to produce the 1-ton truck only for some years. In 1911/1912 the only Sanbert was the 1-ton engine-under-the-seat Model J open truck, which was powered by a 25 hp three-cylinder air-cooled engine and had double chain drive. 

In early 1913 the company was reorganized as the Sanford Motor Truck Company and the truck became known as the Sanford. The original 1-ton truck was replaced by four-cylinder 1-ton and 1-1/2-ton Sanford trucks. By 1916 there were five models in the Sanford truck range from 3/4-ton to 2-ton capacity. The driver-over-engine layout had been replaced by a conventional hood and worm drive had been introduced. A 6-ton model was added in the 1920's. The 1923 models included the 1-1/2-ton Greyhound which was a speed truck with pneumatic tires.

Six-cylinder engines were introduced in 1924 and also during the 1920's fire engines became an important part of the Sanford product range. Sanford production faded through the late 1920's and by 1930 truck production had ceased and the company concentrated exclusively on building fire engines and related apparatus. In the 1930's the demand for fire engines began to fall and the Sanford business finally closed in 1939. 

In 1969 a related company called Sanford Fire Apparatus Corporation was revived in East Syracuse to build fire trucks and apparatus on custom chassis. This company faded out in the 1980's.

Emblems

There are no early original photos or decent illustrations of Sanbert trucks and no specific logo is seen in Sanbert advertisements, see example shown below:

Sanbert truck ad (1911)  catj

It is possible that the Sanbert truck displayed a "Sanbert" script on the front of the radiator but I cannot confirm this.

Early Sanford advertisements did show a "Sanford" script logo, see example shown below:

Sanford truck ad showing script logo (1912)

It is likely that this "Sanford" script was displayed on the front of the radiator but, again, I cannot confirm this. 

Photos of Sanford trucks used in Sanford advertisements from about 1915 are not clear enough to show any radiator emblems. It is possible that a "Sanford" radiator script continued to be used in this period, although this cannot be confirmed. However, the "Sanford" name is seen displayed on nameplates mounted on the sides of Sanford trucks by the driver's seat.  See the Sanford Model M photo in the advertisement shown below:

Sanford ad showing side nameplate (1915)  atj

The "Sanford" side nameplate is more clearly seen in the following truck advertisement and appears to be in the style of the "Sanford" script logo shown earlier above.:

Sanford truck with side nameplate (1919)  ms

The following is an example of an early "Sanford" body side nameplate. This Sanford nameplate is rare.

This is a Sanford body side nameplate (c1915-1919)   lktec
Size: 250mm wide 75mm high

The following "Sanford" nameplate is similar but may have been used on a much later Sanford model:

This is a Sanford side nameplate (date unknown)    lktec
Size: 204mm wide 65mm high

The lack of clear evidence of the use of emblems on Sanford trucks makes dating of known emblems difficult, so there is some speculation in the dates that follow.

The following blue enamel Sanford emblem inscribed "The Sanford Motor Truck" appears to be an early Sanford radiator emblem. This Sanford radiator emblem is extremely rare.

This is believed to be a Sanford radiator emblem (dates unknown) sam
Size: 107mm wide 107mm high    MM: Unknown

The following blue and white enamel Sanford radiator emblem is inscribed "The Sanford Geyhound"  and was used for the Sanford Greyhound speed trucks, which were introduced in 1923. This Sanford radiator emblem is very rare.

This is a Sanford Greyhound radiator emblem (1923-1929) mjs
Size: 76mm diameter   MM: Unknown

The following blue and red enamel Sanford radiator emblem has been reported as being used around 1929 but I cannot confirm this. If you have details of the use of this Sanford radiator emblem, please let me know, in order to update this post. This Sanford radiator emblem is very rare.

This is a Sanford radiator emblem (dates unknown)    mjs
Size: 88mm wide 75mm high    MM: None

The following photo shows a restored Sanford fire engine from 1929 with a radiator emblem impressed into the aluminum radiator tank top. This style of Sanford radiator emblem was likely to have continued in use for Sanford fire trucks through the 1930's.

Sanford fire engine with radiator emblem (1929)   eli d gill

Close-up showing Sanford radiator emblem (1929) 

The following cast aluminum Sanford nameplate may have been use on some Sanford fire truck models:

This is a Sanford nameplate (1930's)    lktec
Size: 205mm wide 55mm high



 

November 18, 2021

COLE

Cole Carriage Co. (1908-1909)
Cole Motor Car Co. (1909-1925)
Indianapolis, Indiana


This is a Cole radiator emblem (1921-1925)     mjs
Size: 56mm diameter   MM: Unknown

Joseph J. Cole had a successful horse-drawn carriage business and decided to build his first high-wheeler buggy in 1908. It is said that Joseph Cole took his prototype high-wheeler for a test drive around the Soldiers and Sailors Monument in Indianapolis in October 1908. The test drive apparently took longer than expected, because Cole had not yet installed any brakes on his car and he had to drive round and round the monument until the car ran out of gasoline.

Cole made and sold 170 high-wheeler buggies, called Cole Solid Tire Automobiles, and then, in 1909, he established the Cole Motor Car Company and introduced a conventional four-cylinder Model 30, which sold well. The Cole was successful in several racing and endurance events. A Cole Six followed in 1913 and, in 1915, Cole introduced a V-8 and all Cole cars thereafter were eight-cylinder models.

All Cole cars were assembled vehicles and the Cole Motor Car Company was proud of this and used the slogan "The Standardized Car" from 1912 until 1915. The Cole Aero Eight was introduced in 1918 with a change in styling. By 1919 the Cole was second only to Cadillac in production among America's high-priced automakers. Cole did well until the postwar recession started to bite and in 1925 Joseph Cole decided to close the business.

Emblems

The first two-cylinder Cole Solid Tire Automobiles, produced in late 1908 and early 1909, did not carry an emblem but did display the "Cole" name on a brass script attached to the radiator core. 

The following 1908 Cole Carriage Company advertisement shows a script on the radiator, although the detail is unclear:

Cole Carriage Co. advertisement (1908)  classicspeedsters

The following original period photo from 1909 shows a radiator script with "COLE" in capital letters. Original Cole scripts in this design are extremely rare.

This is a Cole Solid Tire Automobile with radiator script (1909)  dpl

Later in 1909, a new "Cole 30" script logo was introduced and appeared in subsequent Cole automobile advertisements. The first Cole 30 automobiles produced in late 1909 and in 1910, also did not carry an emblem, but displayed the "Cole 30" name on a brass radiator script, see the Cole 30 Flyer sheet music cover and original photo from 1910 shown below:

Cole 30 Flyer sheet music cover showing rad script (1910)

                                                                                   
Close-up showing the Cole 30 radiator script 

Cole 30 Flyer displaying radiator script (1910)       forums.aaca

The following is an example of a Cole 30 radiator script. Original Cole 30 radiator scripts are rare.
                                                                               
This is a Cole 30 radiator script (1909-1910)    mjs
Size: 250mm wide

The "Cole 30" name was also displayed on the brass hubcaps, see example shown below:

This is a Cole 30 hubcap (1909-1911)    kam

The following original period photos of Cole race cars taken in 1911 show the Cole 30 radiator script mounted in different areas on the radiator and, on the first photo below, the "Cole 30" script is also displayed on the side of the driver's seat.

Cole 30 Race Car (1911)    classicspeedsters

Cole 30 Race Car (1911)     classicspeedsters 

The Cole 30 was exhibited at the 1911 Chicago Auto Show and carried a large radiator emblem, see original photo shown below. The Chicago Auto Show was held in January-February 1911, so the emblem was most likely to have been attached to Cole 30 automobiles built in the latter part of 1910 for the 1911 model year.

This is a Cole car at the Chicago Auto Show (1911)   dpl

This emblem was a large deep blue and white enamel Cole 30 radiator emblem inscribed with "Cole Motor Car Co." and "Indianapolis", see example shown below. This Cole 30 radiator emblem is extremely rare.

This is a Cole 30 radiator emblem (1910-1911)    imsm
Size: 85mm wide 54mm high   MM: Unknown

The following is a surviving Cole 30 from 1911 carrying this radiator emblem:

This is a Cole 30 showing radiator emblem (1911)   imsm

The following announcement published in August 1911 appears to refer to a Cole 30-40 model:

Cole 30-40 Announcement (Aug 1911)   tha 

However, there was no Cole 30-40 model. The Cole 40 was introduced for the 1912 model year, so the Cole 30-40 logo was probably an attempt to advertise the Cole 40 but maintain interest in the Cole 30, which may have continued into 1912 and certainly while existing Cole 30 models were still available for sale. 

In late 1911, the Cole emblem was changed to a "Cole 30-40" radiator emblem suitable for use on both Cole 30 and Cole 40 models, see original photo from 1912 shown below:

This is a Cole showing the Cole 30-40 radiator emblem (1912) dpl

This Cole emblem is the deep blue and white enamel Cole 30-40 radiator emblem shown below. The "Cole Motor Car Co." and "Indianapolis" inscriptions are absent. This Cole 30-40 radiator emblem is extremely rare.

This is a Cole 30-40 radiator emblem (1911-1912)     mjs
Size: 85mm wide 53mm high   MM: Robbins

There was a further change in Cole emblem design to remove the model designation altogether, presumably to allow even wider and simpler use of the emblem. This change probably occurred in 1912 and may have continued in use in 1913, probably for the Cole 40, although I cannot confirm this. I have been unable to find an original photo of a Cole automobile with this radiator emblem.

This emblem is the deep blue and white enamel Cole radiator emblem shown below. This Cole radiator emblem is extremely rare.

This is a Cole radiator emblem (1912-1913)    mjs
Size: 85mm wide 54mm high   MM: Unknown (poss Robbins)

The following shows an example of the large aluminum Cole radiator script seen in original Cole car photos. Original Cole radiator scripts are rare.

This is a Cole radiator emblem (c1911-1913)      mjs
Size: 450mm wide   

The following original photo shows a "Cole" script mounted on the top of the radiator of a Cole truck in Dayton, Ohio in 1913. This is particularly interesting, since I can find no reference to any trucks manufactured by Cole.

Cole truck displaying a Cole radiator script (1913)   tom

Some early Cole models carried kerosene lamps. These kerosene side lamps displayed the "Cole 30" or "Cole" name on small oval-shaped pressed metal emblems. The kerosene lamps and emblems were either brass or painted black with nickel trim in late 1911, see brass example shown below:

Kerosene lamp with a Cole emblem (c1910-1911) kfc

Close up showing Cole lamp emblem

The following are examples of Cole kerosene side lamp emblems. These Cole lamp emblems are rare:

This is a brass Cole 30 kerosene lamp emblem (1910-1911)  mjs
Size: 52mm wide 33mm high    MM: None

This is a painted Cole kerosene lamp emblem (c1911)  mjs
Size: 52mm wide 33mm high   MM: None

There was a complete change in Cole radiator emblem in late 1912 or early 1913, see original Auto Show photo shown below, which is annotated "c1912" and shows Cole automobiles displaying the new radiator emblem:

This Auto Show photo shows Cole autos with the new rad emblem (c1912) dpl

This new emblem has an eagle with a shield, which displays the "Cole" script logo, and has a descriptive ribbon below. The surviving 1913 Cole Model Fifty shown below displays an aluminum radiator script and also carries the new Cole emblem with the inscription "The Standardized Car":

This shows a Cole Model 50 with radiator emblem (1913)  kam

The following photo shows a close-up of the blue and white enamel Cole radiator emblem:

This close-up shows the Cole radiator emblem (1913)   kam
Size: Unknown    MM: Unknown

The following photo shows examples of Cole radiator emblems used in the period 1912 to 1920. There are three different sizes, large, medium and small, with other variations in detailed design, see below:

This shows the three different Cole radiator emblem sizes  mjs
Sizes: See details shown below

There are two different large sized Cole radiator emblems.

The following large sized blue and white enamel Cole radiator emblem is inscribed "Bonus Est", which means (Cole) "Is Good". This Cole radiator emblem was used on the 1912-1913 Cole Series 8. This Cole radiator emblems is very rare.

This is a Cole radiator emblem (1912-1913)   mjs
Size: 71mm wide 69mm high   MM: Unknown

The following large sized blue and white enamel Cole radiator emblem is inscribed "The Standardized Car" and was used on the Cole Series 9 in 1913. This Cole radiator emblem is rare.

This is a Cole radiator emblem (1913)    mjs
Size: 73mm wide 70mm high    MM: Unknown

There are two different medium sized Cole radiator emblems.

The following medium sized blue and white enamel Cole radiator emblems is inscribed "The Standardized Car" and was used on the 1914 Cole 4-40 and 6-60 models. This Cole radiator emblem is rare.

This is a Cole radiator emblem (1914)      mjs
Size: 57mm high 54mm wide   MM: Unknown

The following medium sized blue and white enamel Cole radiator emblem is inscribed "Eight Cylinder" and was used on the 1915 V8 Cole 8-50 model. This Cole radiator emblem is rare.

This is a Cole radiator emblem (1915)   mjs
Size: 57mm high 54mm wide    MM: Unknown

There are two different smaller sized Cole radiator emblems.

The following smaller sized blue and white enamel Cole radiator emblem is inscribed "The Standardized Car" and is believed to have been used on the 1915 Cole 6-50 model, but I cannot confirm this. This Cole radiator emblem is rare.

This is a Cole radiator emblem (1915)      mjs
Size: 54mm wide 52mm high    MM: None

The following smaller sized blue and white enamel Cole radiator emblem is inscribed "Eight Cylinder" and was used from 1916 to about 1920. This Cole radiator emblem is rare.

This is a Cole radiator emblem (1916-c1920)    mjs
Size: 53mm wide 52mm high    MM: Unknown

The first eight-cylinder Cole cars introduced in 1915 were sometimes given a figure "8" to go with the "Cole" radiator script, see the following 1915 Cole Eight advertisement:

This Cole Eight advertisement shows the radiator script (1915) ms

These first eight-cylinder Cole cars also displayed the "Cole 8" name on small round emblems attached to the hubcaps. The first of these Cole 8 hub emblems appeared for 1915 and were inscribed with the "The Standardized Car" slogan, see black enamel example shown below. This Cole hub emblem is scarce.

This is a Cole 8 hub emblem (1915)   mjs
Size: 43mm diameter   MM: Unknown

Some examples of the 1915 black enamel Cole 8 hub emblem inscribed with "The Standardized Car" slogan shown above have been found with an Auld mounting cup on the reverse side. The Auld mounting cup was not used until about 1918. It has been suggested that this was likely to have occurred during the final year for Cole in 1924, when Cole made two final production runs utilizing remaining parts and may have fitted Auld mounting cups to some left over hub emblems from 1915.

The following is a blue and white enamel version of the same Cole 8 hub emblem.  This Cole hub emblem is rare. I do not know which Cole model carried this hub emblem or the precise dates of use. If you have further details of the use of this Cole hub emblem, please let me know, in order to update this post.

This is a Cole 8 hub emblem (c1915)     dnc
Size: 43mm diameter   MM: Unknown

The Cole management wanted to put more emphasis on the "8" and from 1916 the Cole V8 had a new radiator script with a unified "Cole 8" design, as shown in the following Cole advertisement for 1917:
This is a Cole Eight ad showing rad script (1917)  ms

The following is an example of an aluminum unified Cole 8 radiator script introduced in 1916:

This is a Cole Eight radiator script (1916-c1919)     ms
Size: Unknown

The Cole hubcap design was also changed to make the "8" more prominent, see the black painted Cole Eight hubcap shown below:

This is a Cole Eight hubcap (1916-1918)  worthpoint

The Cole Aero Eight introduced in 1918 had new styling and the hub emblem was changed back to the earlier small round black enamel emblem, but this time inscribed "Eight Cylinder", as shown below. These Cole Eight hub emblems are scarce.

This is a Cole Aero Eight hub emblem (1918-c1923)   mjs
Size: 43mm diameter    MM: Unknown (some D L Auld)

The following is a Cole Aero Eight hubcap showing the separate hub emblem:

Cole Aero Eight hubcap with hub emblem (1918-1923) hubcapcollector

Cole advertisements for the Cole Aero Eight introduced in 1918 included a representation of a new trademark in the style of a circular emblem containing the eagle, shield and ribbon as depicted on the earlier Cole radiator emblem. The ribbons had either "EIGHT CYLINDER" or "INDIANAPOLIS" inscriptions, see examples shown below:

Cole Aero Eight ad with new trademark (1918) getty

Close-up showing "EIGHT CYLINDER" trademark

Cole Aero Eight ad showing trademark (1918)  ms

Close-up showing "INDIANAPOLIS" trademark

The "Indianapolis" trademark shown above became the basis for a new Cole radiator emblem, which seems to have been used from 1921, see the round, black and white enamel Cole radiator emblem shown below. This Cole radiator emblem is scarce.

This is a Cole radiator emblem (1921-1925)     mjs
Size: 56mm diameter   MM: Unknown

From 1924, the Cole hub emblem continued the "EIGHT CYLINDER" design as shown earlier but impressed into the face of the hubcap rather than on a separate hub emblem, see example shown below:

Cole Aero Eight hubcap with impressed face (1924-1925)  dkc