June 16, 2024

FERRIS

Ohio Motor Vehicle Co. (1920-1922)

Cleveland, Ohio


This is a Ferris radiator emblem (1920-1922)     sam
Size: 63mm diameter    MM: None

The Ohio Motor Vehicle Company was established in 1919 to produce the Ferris car. The Ferris was a well-built, expensive assembled car. It had high quality coachwork with an aluminum body and a distinctive high radiator.

Initially, the Ferris was a 50 hp six-cylinder model offered in touring, sport and sedan body styles. For 1922, 60 hp and 70 hp models were offered in a wide range of body styles but relatively few were built.

The postwar recession made sales of costly motor cars difficult and Ferris sales were poor. By June 1921 the company was in receivership and production ceased in 1922 having built a total of about 440 cars.

Emblems

The metal Ferris radiator emblem shown above is very rare.

The metal Ferris emblem shown below may be a hub face emblem but I cannot confirm this. This Ferris emblem is also very rare.

This is a Ferris emblem (c1920)      sam
Size: 62mm diameter    MM: Unknown

BERGDOLL

Louis J. Bergdoll Motor Co. (1910-1913)
Philadelphia, Pennsylvania


This is a Bergdoll 30 radiator emblem (1910-1913)   ms
Size: 58mm diameter     MM: Unknown

The Louis J. Bergdoll Motor Company produced some of America's best high-quality automobiles before the First World War. 

The first Begdoll Thirty appeared in 1910 and was a four-cylinder five-passenger touring model. For the 1911 model year, the Bergdoll Thirty was available in nine different body styles. A Bergdoll Forty model joined the Bergdoll Thirty in 1912 and 1913. There were business problems, however, and the company was in receivership in March 1913 and the Bergdoll factory and assets were sold in May 1913.

Emblems

The Bergdoll carried a round radiator emblem, see original period photo shown below from a 1910 auto show:

Bergdoll 30 showing radiator emblem (c1910)  dpl

This emblem is the pale blue and white Bergdoll 30 radiator emblem shown above at the top of this post. This Bergdoll radiator emblem is extremely rare.

Emblem collectors should beware as there are reproduction Bergdoll 30 radiator emblems, see examples shown below. 

The first example is similar to the original Bergdoll 30 radiator emblem shown above at the top of this post but does not have the sun's rays coming out of the winged wheel. It has a shiny back and no maker's mark.

This is a reproduction Bergdoll 30 radiator emblem  pcc

The second reproduction example, shown below, does have the sun's rays but is finished in dark blue and white enamel. This reproduction emblem also has a shiny back and no maker's mark.

This is a reproduction Bergdoll 30 radiator emblem  cwc

The Bergdoll radiator emblem shown above a the top of this post was used for the Bergdoll 30 model. I have not seen a radiator emblem for the Bergdoll 40 model. It is likely that there was such an emblem, although I cannot confirm this. If an original Bergdoll 40 radiator emblem could be found, it would be ultra rare. 

The "Bergdoll" name was also displayed on some models on a brass script mounted on the radiator core, see original period photo of a Bergdoll automobile and a surviving Bergdoll 30, both photos shown below. Original "Bergdoll" radiator scripts are very rare. It is possible that the Bergdoll 40 model simply used the brass radiator script. to avoid the additional cost of a new emblem at a time of financial difficulty. 


Bergdoll auto showing rad emblem & script (1912)  dpl 

Bergdoll Model 30 with radiator script    sillohed





DEMOT

Demotcar Co. (1909-1911)
Detroit, Michigan 


This is a DeMot radiator script (1910)   acmoi

The DeMot was the name given to this car in the first brochure produced by the Demotcar Company. The car name appeared as DeMotCar and Demotcar in the second brochure. In each case the name was short for Detroit Motor Car. 

The Demotcar Company was in trouble almost as soon as it started. The DeMot, a light-weight 8/10 hp two-cylinder runabout, was introduced in September 1909 but the company was bankrupt by August 1910. Production continued under receivership until December 1911.

Emblems

The DeMot had a diamond shaped logo, see below:

This is the DeMot logo   ms

DeMot advertisements from 1910 included this logo and showed an illustration of a DeMot car with what appears to be a "DeMot" radiator emblem in the form of a decal or script displayed on the radiator tank top, see example shown below:

DeMot ad showing logo and rad emblem (1910) ms

Detail showing the DeMot radiator emblem (1910)

I cannot find an original period photo of a DeMot car with the diamond shaped logo style radiator emblem or any other radiator emblem. The clearest original period DeMot car photo that I have seen shows a radiator tank top with no radiator emblem but with the "DeMot" name displayed on a brass script attached to the radiator core. Unfortunately, only a small part of this radiator script is visible, see below:

This is a DeMot car with a radiator script (1910)    dpl

Close-up showing part of radiator script (1910)

This Demot script is in a fluid script style unlike the diamond shaped logo emblem shown earlier. This brass Demot radiator script is seen on a surviving Demot at the Antique Car Museum of Iowa, see below:

Demot car with radiator script (1910)   acmoi

This Demot radiator script, shown above at the top of this post and again below, appears similar to the script seen in the original 1910 photo shown earlier above. 

This is a DeMotcar radiator script (1910)   acmoi

The following very different brass DeMot radiator script is seen on another surviving DeMot runabout at the Petersen Auto Museum in Los Angeles, which also did not carry a radiator emblem. Original DeMot radiator scripts of any design are extremely rare.

This is a DeMot radiator script (1910)     pam

If you have better details of any original DeMot emblems or radiator scripts, please let me know in order to update this post.

The DeMot name was also displayed on hubcaps, see example shown below:

This is a DeMot hubcap (1909-1911)   dkc

The DeMot name was also displayed on a small serial plate attached to the dash, see examples shown below:

This is a DeMot serial plate (c1909)   mjs
Size: 64mm wide 32mm high

DeMotcar serial plate on surviving car (1910)  acmoi


The DeMot serial plates shown above are different but both appear original. These DeMot serial plates are very rare.




AMERICAN TRUCK (1)

American Motor Truck Co. (1906-1911)
Lockport, New York
Findlay Motor Car Co. (1911-1912)
Ewing-American Motor Car Co. (1912)
Findlay, Ohio


This is an American Motor Truck serial plate (c1910)  mjs
Size: 95mm wide 39mm high

The American Motor Truck Company of Lockport, New York began production of electric and gasoline American trucks in 1906. The American trucks were initially available in sizes from 1-ton to 5-ton capacity. By 1909, American trucks were offered in three sizes of 2-ton, 3-ton and 5-ton capacity. 

In 1911, the company moved to Findlay, Ohio and the name was changed to the Findlay Motor Car Company, presumably to take advantage of new financing from Findlay. American trucks were offered in conventional and forward control models. In 1912, the company merged with Ewing-American Motor Car Company. As well as light commercial vehicles and taxicabs, Ewing-American built the American truck before production ceased later in 1912. 

Emblems

Early American Truck advertisements with original period photos of trucks do not show any sign of an emblem or nameplate, see examples shown below:

American Truck ad showing no emblem or nameplate (1908)    catj

American Truck ad showing no emblem (1908)  ebay

However, from late 1909, advertisements and original period photos show a round decal applied to the side of the driver's seat, see examples shown below:

American Truck ad with body side decal & seal trademark (1909) ebay

This body side decal represents the American Truck seal trademark also shown on this advertisement. The detailed design of the seal was simplified in 1910 and continued to be displayed on the side of the driver's seat up to 1911, although some trucks did not show this decal, see examples shown below:

American Truck ad with new seal decal (1910) autogallery


American Truck with decal on side of driver's seat (1910)  dpl

Also, from 1909, some American Trucks displayed an "American" script on the front of the dash or on the hood side in the form of a decal or as a brass script mounted on the radiator core, see examples shown below;

American Truck displaying "American" script on dash (1909)  dpl

American trucks with scripts on radiator or hood side (1909)  dpl 

American truck showing radiator script (1910)   dpl

Yet, there are several original period photos of American trucks after 1910 showing no sign of a script, see examples shown below:

American truck with no emblem or script (c1911)  dpl

American truck with no emblem or script (c1911)  dpl

However, the "American" name was displayed on the serial plates, see example shown above at the top of this post and again below. This American Truck serial plate is very rare.

This is an American Truck serial plate (c1910)  mjs
Size: 95mm wide 39mm high







KENWORTH

Kenworth Motor Truck Co. (1923-present)
Seattle, Washington


This is a Kenworth radiator emblem (c1945-1970's) lktec
Size: 210mm high 102mm wide   MM: None

Harry Kent and Edgar K. Worthington built the six-cylinder Gersix truck in Tacoma, Washington. In 1922, they bought the assets of HRM and Vulcan, two local custom builders of trucks, which, at the time, were the only other truck builders in the Pacific North West.

In 1923, Kent and Worthington reorganized as the Kenworth Motor Truck Company and began producing four-cylinder Kenworth trucks in 1924 when 80 trucks were sold. The first Kenworth trucks were custom built to order but the basic models were 1-1/2-ton, 2-1/2-ton and 4-ton capacity. By 1925, there were five Kenworth models ranging from 1-ton to 5-ton capacity. Kenworth trucks were built individually and could be adapted to suit the specific requirements of customers. Ninety-nine Kenworth trucks were built in 1926. Six-cylinder engines were introduced in 1927.

Thereafter, Kenworth expanded its range of trucks, added buses to the line and set up a new assembly facility in Vancouver in 1929. In 1932, Kenworth was the first American truck manufacturer to offer diesel engines as a factory option. In 1935, Kenworth began to build its own cabs and attractive chrome radiator grilles and, in 1937, Kenworth built their first four-wheel drive trucks and cab over engine models. By 1940, Kenworth trucks ranged from 2-ton to 10-ton capacity and annual Kenworth truck production had risen to 226 units.

Through World War II, Kenworth produced trucks and aircraft for the war effort. In 1944, Kenworth was bought by Pacific Car and Foundry. With new investment, Kenworth continued to grow and, by 1950, forty percent of total Kenworth sales were overseas. In 1972, vehicle production reached 10,000 units for the year. Kenworth has continued to expand and increase its production facilities and remains (as of 2024) a major manufacturer of commercial vehicles in America.

Emblems

The Gersix truck that preceded the Kenworth had a ribbed radiator tank top with a cast radiator emblem. The truck also displayed a "GersiX" hood side nameplate, possibly a decal or stencil, see original photo shown below: 

Gersix truck showing hood side nameplate (c1916) worthingtonpark

The first Kenworth trucks in 1923 also had a ribbed radiator tank top, and displayed "K  W" cast into the tank top, see surviving example shown below:

Kenworth truck with ribbed radiator tank top (1923) dailykos

Close up showing cast in "K  W" radiator emblem (1923)

The Kenworth truck also displayed a "K kenworth W" hood side decal nameplate, see original period Kenworth truck photo below:

Kenworth truck displaying hood side nameplate (1923)   jacques leretrait 

The same cast in radiator emblem and hood side decal nameplate continued in use for heavy duty Kenworth trucks, see surviving 1925 Kenworth Model KS 3-ton truck shown below:

Kenworth truck with cast rad emblem & hood side plate (1925) 
jacques leretrait

Detail showing cast-in rad emblem (1923-c1925) jacques leretrait

Detail showing hood side decal nameplate (1923-c1925)

For some, probably medium duty, Kenworth trucks, there was a different radiator with a cast in emblem, see original period Kenworth truck photo shown below:

Kenworth truck showing different radiator emblem (1924)    jacques leretrait

This is the cast radiator and Kenworth emblem shown below:

This is a Kenworth cast radiator tank top & emblem (c1924) moroz

The following painted nickel emblem is believed to be a Kenworth radiator emblem used on a light duty Kenworth truck, possibly 1-ton models from about 1925, but I cannot confirm this. This Kenworth radiator emblem is rare.

This is a Kenworth radiator emblem (c1925)   mjs
Size: 95mm wide 56mm high   MM: Unknown

There was a diamond shaped Kenworth radiator grille emblem used in the late 1930's, see following Kenworth logging truck advertisement from 1938:

Kenworth logging truck ad (1938)  lktec

Kenworth truck with diamond emblem (1938) lktec

From about 1928 to about 1936, Kenworth trucks with conventional aluminum radiators displayed a separate, originally painted, round radiator emblem, see examples shown below:

Kenworth truck with round radiator emblem (1929) dailykos

Kenworth truck showing radiator emblem (1930)  david berry

This is the painted Kenworth radiator emblem shown below. This Kenworth radiator emblem is rare.

This is a Kenworth radiator emblem (c1929-c1936) mark gepner
Size: Unknown    MM: Unknown

Kenworth trucks in this period also displayed the "Kenworth" name on hood side nameplates and "KW" on the hubcaps, see examples shown below:

Kenworth truck with hood side nameplate (1929)  dailykos

This is a Kenworth truck hubcap (c1928-1934)   dkc
Size: 102mm diameter

There was a change in the Kenworth radiator emblem in about 1936, with the emblem forming part of the hood ornament wrapping over the top of the radiator shell, see examples shown below:

Kenworth shovelnose truck with radiator emblem (1937)  dailykos

Close up showing radiator emblem (1937) 

This is a Kenworth radiator emblem (c1936-1939)  jacques leretrait
Size: Unknown     MM: Unknown

There was a slight change in the design of the now chrome finished hood ornament and emblem by 1940, see examples shown below:

Kenworth radiator emblem (1940)
truckexposure AaronK

This is a Kenworth radiator emblem (c1940)   jacques leretrait
Size: Unknown    MM: Unknown

The Kenworth hood side nameplate was also changed from about 1936, see examples shown below:

Kenworth shovelnose truck showing hood side nameplate (1937)    dailykos

This is the painted Kenworth hood side nameplate shown below. This Kenworth hood side nameplate is rare.

This is a Kenworth hood side nameplate (c1936-1940)  mjs
Size: 230mm wide 43mm high    MM: None

Kenworth COE trucks in this period carried a round radiator emblem at the top center of the radiator grille, see examples shown below:

Kenworth 537 COE oil truck (1940)  gary alan nelson

Kenworth COE truck rad emblem (1940)
facebook

When Kenworth production resumed after the Second World War, the Kenworth carried a new radiator emblem, which was to continue for many years in various forms, see examples shown below:

Kenworth radiator emblem (1945)    dailykos

Kenworth truck tractor with rad emblem (1946)   dailykos

This is the red painted aluminum Kenworth radiator emblem shown above at the top of this post and again below. This Kenworth radiator emblem is rare.

This is a Kenworth radiator emblem (c1945-1970's) lktec
Size: 210mm high 102mm wide   MM: None

There were also changes in the design of the hood side nameplates, see example shown below: 

Kenworth truck tractor with hood side nameplate (1949)  dailykos

This is the red painted Kenworth hood side nameplate. This Kenworth hood side nameplate is rare.

This is a Kenworth hood side nameplate (c1949-1952)   lktec
Size: 305mm wide 65mm high  

The Kenworth radiator emblem introduced in about 1945 and shown earlier above was used on conventional Kenworth truck models but not on cab over engine models until 1969. The following is an example of a Kenworth cab over engine model from 1953-1954 with a very different radiator emblem:

Kenworth COE truck showing radiator emblem (1953-1954)    tad burness

This is the Kenworth radiator emblem shown below. This Kenworth radiator emblem is scarce.

This is a Kenworth COE truck radiator emblem (c1953)   lktec
Size: Approx. 240mm wide 62mm high   MM: None

Other radiator emblems are seen on some Kenworth trucks used by the logging industry, see example shown below:

Kenworth logging truck tractor (date unknown)    dailykos