June 16, 2022

BARRIE

Barrie Carriage Co. (1916-1918)

Barrie, Ontario, Canada


This is a Barrie radiator emblem (1916-1918)     mjs
Size: 60mm wide 53mm high    MM: Unknown

The Barrie Carriage Company was established in 1903 and was successful in building horse drawn carriages.  In 1915, a contract was made with the Bell Motor Car Company of York, Pennsylvania to assemble the Bell motor car in Barrie.

The Barrie was a light touring car powered by a 20 hp four-cylinder Lycoming engine and using mainly parts obtained from the Bell Motor Car Company of York, Pennsylvania. although the Barrie Carriage Company did make some of the body work and upholstery. However, sales were disappointing and Bell had problems procuring materials due to wartime shortages. It was all over for the Barrie in 1918.

Only about 20 Barrie cars were made.

Emblem

The blue and white enamel Barrie radiator emblem shown above is extremely rare.

BABCOCK

H. H. Babcock Co. (1909-1913)

Watertown, New York


This is a Babcock radiator emblem (c1911-1913)     sam
Size: 62mm wide 32mm high      MM: Unknown

H. H. Babcock Company was a well known horse drawn buggy builder when it decided to produce its first high wheeler automobile in 1909. This was an 18 hp two-cylinder buggy runabout, which was followed by conventional four-cylinder automobiles from 1910.

Babcock also built two-cylinder 1500-pound capacity delivery vans from 1911. All Babcock motor vehicle production was discontinued by the end of 1913 but the Company continued to build motor vehicle bodies for other manufacturers, mainly for trucks.

Emblems

The first Babcock high wheelers did not carry a radiator emblem but did display small name plates similar to the Babcock plate shown below:

This is a Babcock nameplate (c1909)     mjs
Size: 55mm wide 18mm high     MM: None

Early two-cylinder Babcock vehicles displayed a brass "Babcock" script attached to the radiator core, see highwheel and conventional wheeled Babcock examples shown below:

Babcock Model A with radiator script (1909)    auta5p

Babcock tourer showing radiator script (c1910)   dpl

This Babcock radiator script continued in use on some models up to the end of production in 1912:

This is a Babcock radiator script (1909-1912)    ms
Size: Unknown

The Babcock four-cylinder models carried a radiator emblem most likely from about 1911, although I cannot confirm this date, The following original photo of a highwheel Babcock touring model with a radiator emblem is dated c1912 but may be earlier.

Babcock highwheel tourer with radiator emblem (poss 1911)  dpl

The same radiator emblem is seen on the following near original surviving Babcock Model H seven-passenger tourer, which also has a radiator script:

Babcock Model H tourer with radiator emblem & script (1912)  bonhams

Babcock Model H radiator emblem (1912)   bonhams

This is the red and white enamel Babcock radiator emblem shown above at the top of this post and again below. This Babcock radiator emblem is extremely rare.

This is a Babcock radiator emblem (c1911-1913)   sam
Size: 62mm wide 32mm high    MM: Unknown

Emblem collectors should beware as there are reproduction Babcock radiator emblems, see example shown below:

This is a reproduction Babcock radiator emblem     ms

The Babcock name was also displayed on the hubcaps, see examples shown below:

Babcock Model H hubcap (1912)   bonhams

This is a Babcock hubcap (c1909-1913)   dkc









DETROIT ELECTRIC

Anderson Carriage Co. (1907-1910)
Anderson Electric Car Co. (1911-1918)
Detroit Electric Car Co. (1919-c1939)
Detroit, Michigan


This is a Detroit Electric wood wheel hub emblem (1911-1918)  mjs
Size: 48mm diameter    MM: Unknown

The Anderson Carriage Company was established in 1884 and moved to Detroit in 1895. In 1907 Anderson moved into the automotive field with the introduction of the Detroit Electric, an urban electric motor car with an advertised 80 miles range on a single battery charge. The car was particularly targeted at women drivers and this was one of the reasons for its continued success. In 1909 Anderson bought the Elwell-Parker Company of Cleveland, which had supplied electric motors to Baker Electric and others, so Anderson was then able to build all the components of the Detroit Electric.

Production of the Detroit Electric grew year by year from 1907 and reached 1,500 in 1910. In 1911, the company was renamed the Anderson Electric Car Company. Some Detroit Electric models in the 1910-1912 period were given false hoods and radiators to make them look like conventional gasoline cars, although most models retained their distinctive electric car appearance. The Anderson Electric Car Company had a program to buy back some of their earlier cars and "remanufacture" them with changes to modernize them. These remanufactured cars were sold as new but kept their old serial numbers. Detroit Electric production continued to grow and reached about 4,700 by 1914. In 1919, after the retirement of William Anderson, the company name was changed again to the Detroit Electric Car Company. 

Commercial vehicles were built from 1909, starting with a 1-ton truck with a single Elwell-Parker electric motor and side-chain drive. The range of trucks grew to a 2-ton vehicle by 1916.  Light trucks and van production continued until 1922 when the company tested a milk delivery van with four alternative driving positions; at the front, at the rear, and on either running-board. Three years later the Detroit Industrial Vehicle Company was founded to develop a gasoline engine version of this delivery vehicle to be called the Divco.

Electric cars were falling out of fashion by the early 1920's but the Detroit Electric remained in production, although mainly on commercial vehicles. Some further Detroit Electric passenger car models were redesigned to look like gasoline cars with a false hood and radiator. After the Great Depression in 1930, sales fell sharply and production was eventually limited to an individual-order basis. Detroit Electric cars became identical to gasoline cars in appearance, some using Willys-Overland coachwork. Some of the final Detroit Electric models in the later 1930's used Dodge hoods and radiator grilles. 

America's most famous and longest-lived electric car, the Detroit Electric, quietly disappeared from the automotive field by about 1939.

Emblems

Precise details of Detroit Electric emblems and their dates of use are difficult to confirm with certainty, so some dates given below may be speculative. 

The Detroit Electric had a distinctive logo that was shown in Detroit Electric advertisements from 1909, see logo shown below:

The Detroit Electric Logo

For most of its life, the Detroit Electric did not carry an emblem on the body of the vehicle but did display the "Detroit" name on the hubcaps, the step plates and on a small maker's nameplate/serial plate attached to the body or on the dash. The following show examples used by the Anderson Carriage Company:

This is a Detroit Electric Model D hubcap (1910)    bonhams

This is the originally black background painted, metal Detroit Electric hub emblem shown below. This Detroit Electric hub emblem is scarce.

This is a Detroit Electric hub emblem (1907-1910)   mjs
Size: 51mm diameter   MM: Unknown

This is a Detroit Electric Model D step plate (1910)  bonhams

This is a Detroit Electric Model D serial plate (1910)  bonhams

From about 1910 to 1912, some Detroit Electric models had a false hood and radiator to make the car appear more conventional but they did not carry a radiator emblem. The following photo shows a restored Detroit Electric, which is stated to be from 1912. The car displays the "Detroit Electric" logo on a script mounted on a false radiator. This Detroit Electric logo style radiator script is not seen on original period photos but is seen on several restored Detroit Electric cars and has most likely been produced specially for the restoration, but I cannot confirm this.

Detroit Electric showing a radiator script (1912)  
vancouver electric vehicle association 

From 1911, the Detroit Electric company name changed to the Anderson Electric Car Company, which appeared on the hub emblems, sill plates, step plates and nameplates, see examples shown below.

The following Detroit Electric emblem, also shown above at the top of this post, is slightly domed. It was originally finished in polished nickel on a dull black background but has been hand painted in restoration. This emblem was used as a wood wheel hub emblem. This Detroit Electric emblem is scarce.

This is a Detroit Electric wood wheel hub emblem (1911-1918)    mjs
Size: 48mm diameter   MM: Unknown

The following is a Detroit Electric wire wheel hub emblem. This Detroit Electric hub emblem is scarce.

This is a Detroit Electric wire wheel hub emblem (c1914-1918)  mjs
Size: 56mm diameter   MM: None

The following is an Anderson Electric Car Company Detroit Electric sill plate:

This is a Detroit Electric sill plate (c1916)   mjs
Size: 307mm wide 26mm high

The following is a Detroit Electric step plate:

This is a Detroit Electric step plate (c1918)    mjs
Size: 210mm wide 103mm high

The following is a Detroit Electric nameplate/serial plate:

This is a Detroit Electric nameplate/serial plate (c1918)  mjs
Size: 89mm wide 25mm high   

The following is a Detroit Electric patent plate. This Detroit Electric patent pale is rare.

This is a Detroit Electric patent plate (c1916)    mjs
Size: 66mm wide 33mm high

The company name was changed to the Detroit Electric Car Company in 1919 and the Detroit Electric hub emblem was changed to the design shown below. Originally, the Detroit Electric hub emblem had the letters and borders finished in polished nickel on a dull black background. This Detroit Electric hub emblem appears to have been superseded later in 1919 but reappeared in the later 1920's. This Detroit Electric hub emblem is scarce.

This is a Detroit Electric hub emblem (1919)   mjs
Size: 50mm diameter    MM: None

In 1919, some Detroit Electric models were given a false hood and Fiat style radiator and carried a radiator emblem, as shown on the following Detroit Electric brochure cover and newspaper advertisement:

Detroit Electric brochure (c1919) historicnewengland

Detroit Electric ad with rad emblem (1919) ld 

This Detroit Electric radiator emblem is seen on the following restored Detroit Electric Model 82 from late 1920:

Detroit Electric Model 82 radiator emblem (1920)
rm sothebys 

Detroit Electric radiator emblem (1920)  rm sothebys

This is the Detroit Electric radiator emblem shown below, which originally had polished nickel letters and borders in a dull black background. This Detroit Electric emblem is rare.

This is a Detroit Electric radiator emblem (1919-c1925)  sam
Size: Unknown   MM: Unknown

The same emblem was also used as the hub emblem, see example shown below:

This is a Detroit Electric hub emblem (c1920)   ms 

The "Detroit Electric" name was also displayed on the sill plates where fitted, see cast metal example shown below:

Detroit Electric sill plate (1926)    rm sothebys

The Detroit Electric radiator emblem seen from 1919 appears to have continued on some Detroit Electric models into the early 1930's, see surviving 1931 Detroit Electric Model 99 showing possible radiator emblem:

Detroit Electric Model 99 Coupe showing radiator emblem (1931)    sportscarmarket

Detroit Electric models in the later 1930's did not carry a radiator emblem but continued to display the "Detroit Electric" name on the hub emblems, which were the same design as the hub emblem shown earlier for 1919, see surviving 1937 Detroit Electric example shown below:

Detroit Electric Model 99 without a radiator emblem (1937)    rmsothebys

Detroit Electric hub emblem (1937)    rmsothebys

I am grateful to Ted Panofsky for his most helpful advice regarding Detroit Electric cars and their emblems. Any errors in my interpretation of this advice is entirely down to me.







CORD

Cord Corp. (1929-1932 & 1936-1937)
Auburn & Connersville, Indiana


This is a Cord emblem (1929-1932)     mjs
Size: 55mm high 39mm wide    MM: D L Auld

Errett Lobban Cord already had a large and successful automobile business when, in 1929, he introduced his front-wheel drive Cord L-29 to fill the price gap between his popularly priced Auburn and the grand and more expensive Duesenberg Model J. The Cord L-29 was a most attractive automobile. Front-wheel drive allowed a much lower and more rakish silhouette than was the norm in automobile styling at that time. Just over 5,000 units were built before the recession put paid to the Cord in 1932.

Four years later, in 1936, the front-wheel drive Cord was back with modern "coffin nose" styling, making the Cord 810 one of the most instantly recognizable American automobiles. A supercharger was added to the Cord 812 in 1937 to deliver 170hp. It was a fine car but Cord decided to leave the automobile industry and production of the Cord automobile ceased in August 1937.

Emblems

The first L-29 Cord displayed a two-piece Cord emblem mounted on the front transmission cover, see example below:

Cord L-29 showing transmission cover emblem (1930)  acdm

Cord L-29 transmission emblem (1931)    acdm

This is the gold plated red, white and black enamel Cord emblem shown above at the top of this post and again below. This Cord emblem is scarce.

This is a Cord transmission cover emblem (1929-1932)  mjs
Size: 55mm high 39mm wide    MM: D L Auld

The L-29 Cord also had a small Cord crest embossed on the dashboard instrument panel and a small oval shaped enamel Cord emblem on the glove compartment lid, see example shown below:

Cord L-29 instrument panel showing embossed Cord crest and glove box lid emblem (1929-1932) bonhams

The following is an example of the small, oval shaped, red, white and black enamel glove box Cord emblem. This Cord glove box emblem is rare.

This is a Cord glove box lid emblem (1929-1932)    mjs
Size: 28mm high 20mm wide   MM: D L Auld

The following photo illustrates the size difference of these L-29 Cord emblems:

Cord L-29 transmission cover & glove box lid emblems   mjs

The "Cord" name was also displayed on the hubcaps, see painted Cord hub emblem shown below.:

This is a Cord hub emblem (1929-1932)   mjs
Size: 71mm diameter   MM: D L Auld

The new Cord 810/812 in 1936 carried a one-piece enamel emblem mounted on the front transmission cover, see example below:

Cord Model 812 transmission cover emblem (1937)  rmsothebys

This is the red, white and black enamel Cord emblem shown below. This Cord emblem is scarce.

This is a Cord transmission cover emblem (1936-1937)  ms
Size: 55mm high 40mm wide   MM: Unknown (some Fox)

This Cord transmission cover emblem is also found gold plated, see example shown below:

This is a Cord transmission cover emblem (1936-1937)   acdm
Size: 55mm high 40mm wide    MM: Unknown (some Fox)

This Cord emblem was available as an optional extra as part of a winged version mounted on the front of the hood, see example shown below:

Cord 810 with transmission cover & winged hood emblem (1936) conceptcarz

This is the metal winged, red, white and black enamel Cord hood emblem shown below. The center emblem is the same as the transmission cover emblem shown earlier above. This Cord hood emblem is rare.

This is a Cord winged hood emblem (1936-1937)    bonhams
Size: Unknown    MM: Unknown